Goddess of storms

Goddess of storms DEFAULT

Ran - Goddess of storms and the drowned dead. - Norse Goddess

NameTitleType

Aegir

God of the ocean.

God

Balder

Fairest of the Gods

God

Bergelmir

Father of the Frost Giants.

God

Bestla

Mother Goddess.

Goddess

Borr

Creator God.

God

Bragi

God of poets and skaldi.

God

Buri

Creator God.

God

Bylgia

Water Goddess

Goddess

Dagur

The personification of day.

God

Dellingr

God of the Dawn.

God

Eir

Goddess of healing.

Goddess

Forseti

God of justice who settles court disputes in his gilded hall.

God

Freya

Goddess of love, beauty and sensuality.

Goddess

Freyr

God of fertility, sun and rain.

God

Frigg

Wife of Odin and the goddess of marriage and fertility.

Goddess

Gefion

Goddess of agriculture.

Goddess

Gerd

Goddess of Ferility

Goddess

Heimdall

God of light and protection.

God

Hel

Goddess of death.

Goddess

Hermod

The messenger of the gods.

God

Hodr

Blind god of darkness and winter.

God

Idun

Goddess of the spring and eternal youth.

Goddess

Jord

Goddess of the primitive and unpopulated earth.

Goddess

Kvasir

The wisest of the Vanir gods.

God

Lofn

Goddess of forbidden love, who blesses all illicit love affairs.

Goddess

Loki

Trickster god of the Norse.

God

Magni

Son of Thor and god of brute strength.

God

Mani

God of the moon

God

Miming

Minor forest god.

God

Mimir

God of knowledge and wisdom.

God

Nanna

Norse Goddess

Goddess

Njord

God of the sea, wind and fire.

God

Norns

The triple goddesses of fate and destiny.

Goddess

Nott

Goddess of night.

Goddess

Odin

God of war.

God

Ran

Goddess of storms and the drowned dead.

Goddess

Regin

God of metalworkers and craftsmen.

God

Rigr

Creator God.

God

Saga

Goddess of poetry and history.

Goddess

Sif

Goddess of the earth.

Goddess

Sjofn

Goddess of love, passion and marital harmony.

Goddess

Skadi

Goddess of Bowhunting.

Goddess

Sol

Goddess of the sun.

Goddess

Syn

Goddess of watchfulness and truth.

Goddess

Thor

Thunder-god and the protector of men and gods.

God

Tyr

God of Law.

God

Ullr

God of justice and duelling, archery and skiing.

God

Vali

Son of Odin

God

Valkyries

The battle-maidens.

Goddess

Var

Goddess of contracts and oaths.

Goddess

Ve

Creator God.

God

Vidar

Son of Odin and the god of silence and vengeance.

God

Vili

Creator God.

God

Volla

Goddess of Bounty and Fertility.

Goddess

Ymir

Primordial God.

God

Sours: http://www.thewhitegoddess.co.uk/divinity_of_the_day/norse/ran.asp

Tempestas - Goddess of storms or sudden weather. - Roman Goddess

NameTitleType

Abundantia

Goddess of Abundance and Prosperity.

Goddess

Acca Larentia

Goddess of Fertility.

Goddess

Acis

God of the Acis River in Sicily.

God

Aesculapius

God of health and medicine.

God

Aeternitas

Gddess and personification of eternity.

Goddess

Angerona

Goddess who relieved people from pain and sorrow.

Goddess

Angitia

Goddess associated with snakes and Medea.

Goddess

Anna Perenna

Goddess of the circle of the year

Goddess

Antevorta

Goddess of the future.

Goddess

Averruncus

God of averting harm.

God

Bacchus

God of Wine

God

Bellona

Goddess of War.

Goddess

Bona Dea

Goddess of Chastity and Fertility.

Goddess

Bonus Eventus

God of Success.

God

Caca

Fire Goddess

Goddess

Cacus

God of fire.

God

Caelus

God of the Sky.

God

Cardea

Goddess of the hinge

Goddess

Carmenta

Goddess of childbirth and prophecy

Goddess

Ceres

Goddess of Corn.

Goddess

Clementia

Goddess of forgiveness and mercy.

Goddess

Cloacina

Goddess who presided over the system of sewers in Rome

Goddess

Concordia

Goddess of agreement, understanding, and marital harmony.

Goddess

Consus

Chthonic god protecting grain storage.

God

Cupid

God of Love.

God

Dea Dia

Goddess of growth.

Goddess

Dea Tacita

Goddess of the dead

Goddess

Decima

Goddess of the measurer of the thread of life.

Goddess

Diana

Goddess of Fertility, Hunting, and the Moon

Goddess

Dis Pater

God of wealth and the underworld.

God

Disciplina

Goddess and personification of discipline.

Goddess

Dius Fidius

God of oaths.

God

Egeria

Water Goddess and Oracle

Goddess

Fascinus

Phallic god who protected from envy and the evil eye.

God

Fauna

Goddess of prophecy.

Goddess

Faunus

God of Prophecy

God

Faustitas

Goddess of Livestock.

Goddess

Febris

Goddess of Fevers.

Goddess

Februus

God of purification.

God

Fecunditas

Personification of fertility.

Goddess

Felicitas

Goddess of good luck.

Goddess

Feronia

Goddess of Fertility and Abundance.

Goddess

Fides

Goddess of Trust

Goddess

Flora

Goddess of Flowers

Goddess

Fontus

God of Wells and Springs.

God

Fortuna

Goddess of Fortune and Luck.

Goddess

Furrina

Goddess of Water and Springs.

Goddess

Inuus

God of fertility.

God

Invidia

Goddess of envy or jealousy.

Goddess

Iris

Goddess of the rainbow.

Goddess

Janus

God of Gates and Doors.

God

Juno

Goddess of Marriage and Women.

Goddess

Jupiter

Supreme King of the Gods

God

Justitia

Goddess of justice.

Goddess

Juturna

Goddess of fountains, wells, and springs.

Goddess

Juventas

Goddess of youth.

Goddess

Lares

God of Household and Estate.

God

Laverna

Goddess of thieves, con men and charlatans.

Goddess

Levana

Goddess of Childbirth.

Goddess

Liber

God of male fertility, viniculture and freedom.

God

Libera

Goddess of Fertility

Goddess

Libertas

Goddess of freedom.

Goddess

Libitina

Goddess of Funerals

Goddess

Lua

Goddess to whom soldiers sacrificed captured weapons.

Goddess

Lucina

Goddess of Childbirth.

Goddess

Luna

Goddess of the Moon.

Goddess

Maia

Goddess of Growth and Increase.

Goddess

Mana Genita

Goddess of infant mortality.

Goddess

Mania

Goddess of the Underworld and the dead.

Goddess

Mantus

God of the dead

God

Mars

God of War.

God

Mater Matuta

Goddess of dawn and childbirth, patroness of mariners.

Goddess

Meditrina

Goddess of healing.

Goddess

Mefitis

Goddess and personification of poisonous gases and volcanic vapours.

Goddess

Mellona

Goddess of bees and beekeeping

Goddess

Mercury

Messenger God and God of Commerce

God

Minerva

Goddess of Wisdom, Arts, and Trade.

Goddess

Mithras

God of Sun and Light

God

Moneta

Goddess of memory and money.

Goddess

Mors

Personification of death.

God

Morta

Goddess of death.

Goddess

Naenia

Goddess of funerary laments.

Goddess

Nascio

Personification of the act of birth.

Goddess

Necessitas

Goddess of destiny.

Goddess

Neptune

God of the Sea.

God

Nerio

Ancient war goddess and valor.

Goddess

Nixi

Goddesses of childbirth.

Goddess

Nona

The spinner of the thread of life.

Goddess

Ops

Goddess of Fertility

Goddess

Orcus

God of the underworld and punisher of broken oaths.

God

Palatua

Goddess who guarded the Palatine Hill.

Goddess

Pales

Goddess of Flocks and Sheppards.

Goddess

Pax

Goddess of peace.

Goddess

Picumnus

God of fertility.

God

Pietas

Goddess of duty.

Goddess

Pilumnus

God of protection of infants at birth.

God

Pomona

Goddess of Fruit Trees and Fruit

Goddess

Portunes

God of keys, doors, and livestock.

God

Postverta

Goddess of childbirth and the past.

Goddess

Priapus

God of Fertility.

God

Proserpine

Goddess of the Underworld

Goddess

Providentia

Goddess of forethought.

Goddess

Quirinus

War God.

God

Quiritis

Goddess of motherhood.

Goddess

Rumina

Goddess who protected breastfeeding mothers.

Goddess

Salacia

Goddess of seawater.

Goddess

Salus

Goodess of Well-being, Health and Prosperity

Goddess

Sancus

God of loyalty, honesty, and oaths.

God

Saturn

God of Seeds and Harvest.

God

Silvanus

God of woodlands and forests.

God

Sol Invictus

Sun God.

God

Spes

Goddess of hope.

Goddess

Stata Mater

Goddess who protected against fires.

Goddess

Sterquilinus

God of fertilizer.

God

Strenua

Goddess of the new year.

Goddess

Summanus

God of Nocturnal Thunder.

God

Tempestas

Goddess of storms or sudden weather.

Goddess

Terminus

God of Boundary Markers.

God

Terra

Goddess of the Earth

Goddess

Tiberinus

River God.

God

Tranquillitas

Goddess of peace and tranquility.

Goddess

Trivia

Goddess of crossroads and magic.

Goddess

Vacuna

Goddess of rest after harvest.

Goddess

Vejovis

God of Healing

God

Venus

Goddess of Beauty and Love.

Goddess

Veritas

Goddess of truth.

Goddess

Vertumnus

God of Seasons

God

Vesta

Goddess of the Hearth.

Goddess

Vica Pota

Goddess of victory and competitions.

Goddess

Victoria

Goddess of victory.

Goddess

Virbius

God of the Forests.

God

Volturnus

God of Water.

God

Voluptas

Goddess of pleasure.

Goddess

Vulcan

God of Fire.

God

Sours: http://www.thewhitegoddess.co.uk/divinity_of_the_day/roman/tempestas.asp
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A weather god, also frequently known as a storm god, is a deity in mythology associated with weather phenomena such as thunder, lightning, rain, wind, storms, tornados, and hurricanes. Should they only be in charge of one feature of a storm, they will be called a (insert weather attribute here) god/goddess, such as a rain god or a lightning/thunder god. This singular attribute might then be emphasized more than the generic, all-encompassing term "storm god", though with thunder/lightning gods, the two terms seem interchangeable. They feature commonly in polytheistic religions.

Storm gods are most often conceived of as wielding thunder and/or lightning (some lightning gods' names actually mean "thunder", but since you cannot have thunder without lightning, they presumably wielded both). The ancients didn't seem to differentiate between the two, which is presumably why both the words "lightning bolt" and "thunderbolt" exist despite being synonyms. Storm gods are typically male (especially the lightning/thunder ones), powerful and irascible (the irascibility is probably a trait because of the command over thunder/lightning, thus the god's power over this aspect of the natural world influences his personality). Rain and wind deities tend to not be portrayed as wrathful as thunder/lightning deities.

Africa[]

Ancient Egypt[]

  • Horus, the Egyptian beneficial storm, sun, and war god. Personified in the pharaoh.
  • Set, the Egyptian storm god, lord of the desert.

Sub-Saharan Africa[]

  • Umvelinqangi, god of thunder, Zulu mythology
  • Mbaba Mwana Waresa, goddess of rain, Zulu mythology
  • Oya, the Yorubaorisha of winds, tempests, and cyclones

Americas[]

  • Chaac, Maya rain god. Aztec equivalent is Tlaloc.
  • Coatrisquie, Taíno rain goddess, servant of Guabancex, and sidekick of thunder god Guatauva.
  • Cocijo, Zapotec god of lightning.
  • Ehecatl, Aztec god of wind.
  • Guabancex, top Taíno storm goddess; the Lady of the Winds who also dishes out earthquakes and other natural disasters.
  • Guatauva, Taíno god of thunder and lightning who is also responsible for rallying the other storm gods.
  • Huracán, K'iche Maya god of wind, storms, and fire.
  • Juracán, Taíno zemi or deity of chaos and disorder believed to control the weather, particularly hurricanes
  • K'awiil, classic Maya god of lightning.
  • Q'uq'umatz, K'iche Maya god of wind and rain, also known as Kukulkan, Aztec equivalent is Quetzalcoatl
  • Tezcatlipoca, Aztec god of hurricanes and night winds.
  • Tlaloc, Aztec rain and earthquake god. Mayan equivalent is Chaac.
  • Tohil, K'iche Maya god of rain, sun, and fire.
  • Tupã, the Guaraní god of thunder and light. Creator of the universe.
  • Yopaat, a Classic-period Maya storm god.

Asia and Oceania[]

  • Adad, the Assyrian storm god
  • Ba'al, Canaanite god of fertility, weather, and war.
  • Hadad, the Canaanite and Carthaginian storm, fertility, & war god. Identified as Baʿal's true name at Ugarit.
  • Fuujin, Japanese wind god.
  • Indra, Hindu thunder/lightning god.
  • Küdryrchö Jumo, the Mari storm god.
  • Marduk, Babylonian god of water, vegetation, judgment, and magic.
  • Mariamman, Hindu rain goddess.
  • Raijin, Japanese god of thunder, lightning, and storms
  • Susanoo, tempestuous Japanese god of storms and the sea.
  • Tamar (goddess), Georgian virgin goddess who controlled the weather.
  • Tarḫunna, Hittite storm god; other Anatolian languages had similar names for their storm gods, such as Luwian below.
  • Tarḫunz, Luwian storm god.
  • Tāwhirimātea, Maori storm god.
  • Teshub, Hurrian storm god.
  • Theispas or Teisheba, the Urartian storm and war god.
  • Vayu, Hindu/Vedic wind god.
  • Vayu-Vata, Iranian duo of gods, the first is the god of wind, much like the Hindu Vayu.
  • Weather god of Nerik, Hittite god of the weather worshiped in the village of Nerik.
  • Weather god of Zippalanda, Hittite god of the weather worshiped in the village of Zippalanda.
  • Yahweh, Hebrew divine warrior and god of the entire cosmos.
  • There was no single storm god in Chinese mythology. There had to be many deities for a single storm:
    • Dian Wu, Lei Gong, and Wen Zhong, the Thunder Deities.
    • Feng Bo, Feng Po Po, and Han Zixian, the Deities of Wind.
    • Yunzhongzi, the Master of Clouds.
    • Yu Shi, the God of Rain.
    • Sometimes the Dragon Kings were included instead of Yu Shi

Europe[]

  • Aeolus (son of Hippotes), keeper of the winds in the Odyssey
  • Anemoi, collective name for the gods of the winds in Greek mythology, their number varies from 4 to more
  • Audra, Lithuanian god of storms
  • Bangpūtys, Lithuanian god of storms and the sea
  • Freyr, Norse god of rain and sunshine
  • Jupiter, the Roman thunder/lightning and sky god and king of the gods
  • Perkūnas, Baltic god of thunder, rain, mountains, and oak trees. Servant of the creator god Dievas.
  • Perun, Slavic god of thunder and lightning and king of the gods
  • Tempestas, Roman goddess of storms or sudden weather. Commonly referred to in the plural, Tempestates.
  • Thor, Norse god of thunder/lightning, oak trees, protection, strength, and hallowing. Also Thunor and Donar, the Anglo-Saxon and Continental Germanic versions, respectively, of him. All descend from Common Germanic *Thunraz, the reflex of the PIE thunder god for this language branch of the Indo-Europeans.[1]
  • Taranis, Celtic god of thunder, often depicted with a wheel as well as a thunderbolt[2]
  • Ukko, Finnish thunder and harvest god and king of the gods
  • Zeus, Greek thunder/lightning and sky god and king of the gods

See also[]

References[]

  1. ↑Orel (2003:429)
  2. ↑Paul-Marie Duval. 2002. Les Dieux de la Gaule. Paris, Éditions Payot.
Sours: https://mythus.fandom.com/wiki/Weather_deity
Oya(The goddess of storms) by ELLA ANDALL

KYMOPOLEIA

Greek Mythology >> Nymphs >> Haliae >> Cymopoleia (Kymopoleia)
Greek Name

Κυμοπολεια

Transliteration

Kymopoleia

Latin Spelling

Cymopoleia

Translation

Wave-Ranging (kyma, poleô)

KYMOPOLEIA (Cymopoleia) was a sea-nymph daughter of the god Poseidon and the wife of the hundred-handed, storm-giant Briareos. She was probably a goddess of the violent storm waves generated by her husband.


PARENTS

POSEIDON & AMPHITRITE(Hesiod Theogony 817 & 240)

OFFSPRING

Perhaps OIOLYKA (by Briareos)


ALTERNATE NAMES

Greek Name

Κυματοληγη

Transliteration

Kymatolêgê

Latin Spelling

Cymatolege

Translation

Wave-Stiller (kyma)


CLASSICAL LITERATURE QUOTES

Hesiod, Theogony 817 ff (trans. Evelyn-White) (Greek epic C8th or 7th B.C.) :
"But the glorious allies of loud-crashing Zeus [i.e. the three Hekatonkheires] have their dwelling upon Okeanos' (Oceanus') foundations, even Kottos (Cottus) and Gyes; but Briareos (Briareus), being goodly, the deep-roaring Earth-Shaker [Poseidon] made his son-in-law, giving him Kymopoleia (Cymopoleia) his daughter to wed."

Hesiod, Theogony 140 ff :
"[The Nereid] Kymodoke (Cymodoce) who, with Kymatolege (Cymatolege) and Amphitrite, light of foot, on the misty face of the open water easily stills the waves and hushes the winds in their blowing."
[N.B. Kymatolege is named in connection with the Nereides but was not numbered amongst them. She was probably Kymopoleia, daughter of Amphitrite, who occurs later in Hesiod.]


SOURCES

GREEK

BIBLIOGRAPHY

A complete bibliography of the translations quoted on this page.

Sours: https://www.theoi.com/Nymphe/NympheKymopoleia.html

Of storms goddess

SKY GODS

Greek Mythology >> Greek Gods >> Sky Gods

The gods of sky and weather were named "Theoi Ouranioi" or "Theoi Meteoroi" by the Greeks. They were under the command of Zeus and Hera, the king and queen of heaven.


A COMPLETE LIST OF GREEK SKY GODS & GODDESSES

Selene the Moon

AEOLUS (Aiolos) The king of the winds. He was appointed by Zeus to guard the storm winds which he kept locked away inside the floating island of Aeolia, releasing them at the request of the gods to wreak their havoc.

AETHER (Aither) The primeval god of the shining light of the blue sky. He was conceived of as the substance of light, a layer of bright mist which lay between the dome of heaven and the lower air which surrounded the earth.

ANEMI (1) (Anemoi) The gods of the four directional winds and the heralds of the four seasons. Boreas the north wind was the lord of winter, Zephyros the west was the bringer of spring, Euros the east was the god of autumn, and Notos the south of summer.

ANEMOI (2) The Daemones of the violent storm-winds. They were sons of the monster Typhoeus kept locked away inside Tartarus or the floating island of Aeolus to be released only at the command of the gods.

ARCE (Arke) The messenger of the Titans. She was the sister of Iris and the goddess of the lost second rainbow. At the end of the Titan-war she was stripped of her wings and locked away inside the pit of Tartarus.

ASTRAEUS (Astraios) The Titan god of the stars. He was father of the planets and the four seasonal winds by Eos the dawn.

ASTRA PLANETI (Astra Planetoi) The gods of the five wandering-stars or planets. The leader of these was bright Eosphoros, the god of the dawn-star Venus. The other four were Pyroeis (star Mars), Phaenon (star Saturn), Phaethon (star Jupiter) and Stilbon (star Mercury).

ASTROTHESIAE (Astrothesiai) The spirits or living forms of the heavenly constellations. They were mostly heroes and creatures who were placed amongst the stars by the gods as reward for some service or, in a handful of cases, as a memorial of their crimes.

ATLAS A Titan condemned by Zeus to hold the sky aloft upon his shoulders and turn it upon its axis. Homer in the Odyssey seems to suggest that he was released from this labour and appointed keeper of the pillars of heaven, presumably the ones erected by Heracles at the ends of the earth.

AURA The Titan goddess of the breeze.

AURAE (Aurai) The nymphs of the breezes.

BOREAS The god of the north wind whose wintry breath brought the cold of winter. He dwelt in a cave in the mountains of the far northern land of Thrace.

CHAOS (Khaos) The primeval goddess of the gap between heaven and earth. She was the air which men breathed. Below Chaos her lay the flat body of the earth, and above the shining mists of the protogenos Aether. Chaos was the mother of Darkness and Night and of the birds.

CHIONE (Khione) The goddess of snow. She was daughter a daughter of Boreas, god of the wintry north wind.

CHRONOS The old god of time who turned the wheel of the heavenly constellations. He was sometimes equated with Cronus, the father of Zeus.

CYCLOPES (Kyklopes) Three giant sons of Uranus (Heaven) who forged the lightning and thunder of Zeus. Their three brothers, the Hecatoncheires, were the gods of violent storms.

EOS The winged goddess of the dawn. She heralded the rising of the sun with her rosy brilliance.

EOSPHORUS (Eosphoros) The god of the dawn-star (the star Venus) seen in the morning skies. He was originally regarded as being distinct from Hesperus, the god of the evening star.

EURUS (Euros) The god of the east wind and herald of the autumn season.

HARPYIAE (Harpyiai) Daemones of whirlwinds and storm gusts. They were known as the hounds of Zeus and blamed for the dissappearance of people without a trace.

HECATONCHEIRES (Hekatonkheires) Three hundred-armed, fifty-headed giants. They were the gods of violent storms which they released from the gates of Tartarus.

HELIUS (Helios) The god of the sun whose orb was he wore upon his head as a bright aureole crown. Helios drove a fiery chariot drawn by four winged steeds.

HEMERA The primeval goddess of the day. In the early morn she scattered the mists of her mother Nyx (Lady Night), to reveal the shining light of Aether, the blue sky.

Astrape

HERA The Queen of Heaven and goddess of the air and starry constellations. The Milky Way was spilt from her breast and most of the other constellations placed in the heavens at her command.

HERSE The goddess of the morning dew.

HESPERIDES The goddesses of sunsets. The three Hesperides tended the tree of the golden apples on Erythea, the Red Isle, in the western stream of the river Oceanus. The apples were a wedding present from Gaea to the sky-gods Zeus and Hera. They were the source of the golden light of sunset, created to celebrate the nuptials of the sky-gods.

HESPERUS (Hesperos) The god of the evening star (the planet Venus). He was originally distinct from his stellar counterpart Eosphorus, the dawn-star.

HORAE (1) (Horai) Three goddesses of the seasons and the ordering of time named Eirene, Eunomia and Dike. They directed the constellations and guiding the Sun in his heavenly course.

HORAE (2) (Horai) The goddesses of the twelve hours of the day. They were originally the same as the first three mentioned above.

HYADES Nymphs of the five stars of the constellation Hyades. They were daughters of the Titan Atlas. Their rising marked the start of the rainy month of spring.

IRIS The goddess of the rainbow. She was the divine messenger of the Olympian gods.

MENAE The nymphs of the fifty new moons of the Olympiad (a period of four years). Fifty moons were significant because this number marked the conjunction of solar and lunar calendars. The goddesses themselves were daughters of the moon-goddess Selene.

NEPHELAE (Nephelai) The nymphs of the clouds. They were daughters of the earth-encircling, river Oceanus from whose waters they drew the rain.

NOTUS (Notos) The god of the wet and stormy south wind who heralded the month of summer.

NYX The primeval goddess of night. In the evening Nyx drew her curtain of dark mists across the sky, cloaking the light of her son Aether, the shining blue sky. In the morn, her daughter Hemera (the goddess Day) lifted the dark mantle.

OCEANIDES (Okeanides)The daughters of the earth-encircling river Oceanus. Some of these were nymphs of clouds (Nephelae) and moistening breezes (Aurae).

OREITHYIA The goddess of cold, gusty mountain winds. She was the wife of Boreas, the wintry north wind, and the mother of Chione, snow.

PLEIADES The nymphs of the seven stars of the constellation Pleiades. They were daughters of the Titan Atlas whose rising and setting were of key importance in the agricultural calendar.

SELENE The goddess of the moon. She rode across the sky on the back of a bull, an ass, or in chariot drawn by winged horses. The moon itself was her crown or billowing veil.

URANUS (Ouranos) The primeval god whose body formed the solid dome of heaven. The Greeks imagined him as a bronze-bodied, star-spangled god whose hands rested upon the earth in the farthest east and feet in the farthest west. He was similar in form to the Egyptian goddess Nut whose starry arching form is common in art. Uranus was a eunuch god, having been castrated by Cronus at the beginning of time.

ZEPHRYUS (Zephyros) The god of the gentle west wind and the herald of spring. He was the husband of Chloris, the goddess of flowers, and the father of Carpus, fruits.

ZEUS The King of the Gods and the ruler of the heavens. He was the god of clouds, rain, thunder and lightning.

ZODIAC (Zodiakos) The spirits of the twelve constellations of the zodiac circled heaven measuring the seasons of the year.


Helius God of the Sun

Sours: https://www.theoi.com/greek-mythology/sky-gods.html
Song of Storms vs Ballad of the Goddess feat Fairy Queen

Taranis

Taranis was the Celtic god of storms, represented by the sacred wheel, an important symbol in Celtic mythology. Known as the Thunderer, he traveled across the world at great speeds.

Taranis was the Thunderer, the pan-Celtic god of storms and thunder. Associated with bad weather and sacred wheels, he held an important role in many Celtic pantheons, yet little was known about him.

Etymology

Taranis’ name literally meant “thunder,” appears to have been derived from the Proto-Celtic toranos, and is evidenced in several surviving Celtic languages. His name was similar to many Indo-European thunder gods. Because of his association with the sacred wheel, he was called a “wheel god.”

Attributes

Taranis was a powerful deity, commanding the storms which terrified early man. He was a protector and leader of the gods and, according to the Romans, this made him worthy of human sacrifice. He formed a sacred triad with the gods, Esus and Toutatis, two other important Gaelic deities who were frequently found at sites bearing Taranis’ symbols.

Taranis wielded a powerful thunderbolt as a weapon, not unlike a spear, and his symbol was a wheel, one of the most sacred Celtic symbols found across Europe. The wheel represented mobility, one of the strengths of the ancient Celts, and may have represented just how quickly a storm could catch ancient humans unprepared.

Mythology

Taranis was known to us primarily the Romans, but also via his connection to other pantheons.

Historical Scholarship

And those who pacify with blood accursed
Savage Teutates, Hesus’ horrid shrines,
And Taranis’ altars cruel as were those
Loved by Diana, goddess of the north
-Pharsalia, Book I, Lucan

Taranis was a Celtic god described in several Roman sources, including Pharsalia by the poet, Lucan, though this may have been a creative invocation. Sacred sites found around Europe illustrated his widespread worship (though no evidence of human sacrifice was directed at him), with statues or wheels located in Ireland, Britain, Gaul, Spain, and across the Rhineland and Danube areas of central and eastern Europe.

Other Mythology

Taranis was known in Irish mythology as Tuireann, and played an important part in the story of Lugh, another pan-Celtic deity. He was also related to the Gaulish Ambisagrus. For the Romans, Taranis was associated with both Jupiter and the cyclops, Brontes, whose name similarly means “thunder.”

Other Indo-European thunder gods shared a common etymology with Taranis, most notably the Norse Thor. Baltic deities, such as Perkunas and Slavic Perun, also resembled Taranis’ name.

Pop Culture

Taranis was popular in modern media, including:

References

Bibliography

  1. Lucan. Pharsalia. Online Medieval and Classical Library. Accessed 19 June, 2019, http://mcllibrary.org/Pharsalia/.

Citation

About the Author

Gregory Wright is a writer and historian with an M.A. in East Asian Studies from the University of Texas at Austin.

Sours: https://mythopedia.com/celtic-mythology/gods/taranis/

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Weather god

Deity associated with thunder, rains and storms

A weather god, also frequently known as a storm god, is a deity in mythology associated with weather phenomena such as thunder, lightning, rain, wind, storms, tornados, and hurricanes. Should they only be in charge of one feature of a storm, they will be called after that attribute, such as a rain god or a lightning/thunder god. This singular attribute might then be emphasized more than the generic, all-encompassing term "storm god", though with thunder/lightning gods, the two terms seem interchangeable. They feature commonly in polytheistic religions.

Storm gods are most often conceived of as wielding thunder and/or lightning (some lightning gods' names actually mean "thunder",[1][2][3] but since one cannot have thunder without lightning, they presumably wielded both). The ancients didn't seem to differentiate between the two, which is presumably why both the words "lightning bolt" and "thunderbolt" exist despite being synonyms. Storm gods are typically male (especially the lightning/thunder ones), powerful and irascible (the irascibility is probably a trait because of the command over thunder/lightning, thus the god's power over this aspect of the natural world influences his personality). Rain and wind deities tend to not be portrayed as wrathful as thunder/lightning deities.

Africa and the Middle East[edit]

Sub-Sahara Africa[edit]

  • Umvelinqangi, god of thunder, Zulu mythology
  • Mbaba Mwana Waresa, goddess of rain, Zulu mythology
  • Oya, the Yorubaorisha of winds, tempests, and cyclones
  • Bunzi, goddess of rain, in Kongo mythology.

Afroasiatic Middle East[edit]

Canaanite[edit]

  • Ba'al, Canaanite god of fertility, weather, and war.
  • Hadad, the Canaanite and Carthaginian storm, fertility, & war god. Identified as Baʿal's true name at Ugarit.

Egyptian[edit]

Mesopotamian[edit]

  • Adad, the Assyrian storm god
  • Marduk, Babylonian god of water, vegetation, judgment, and magic.

Western Eurasia[edit]

Balto-Slavic[edit]

Celtic[edit]

  • Taranis, Celtic god of thunder, often depicted with a wheel as well as a thunderbolt[4]

Norse-Germanic[edit]

  • Freyr, Norse god of rain and sunshine
  • Thor, Norse god of thunder/lightning, oak trees, protection, strength, and hallowing. Also Thunor and Donar, the Anglo-Saxon and Continental Germanic versions, respectively, of him. All descend from Common Germanic *Thunraz, the reflex of the PIE thunder god for this language branch of the Indo-Europeans.[5]

Greco-Roman[edit]

  • Aeolus (son of Hippotes), keeper of the winds in the Odyssey
  • Anemoi, collective name for the gods of the winds in Greek mythology, their number varies from 4 to more
  • Jupiter, the Roman thunder/lightning and sky god and king of the gods
  • Tempestas, Roman goddess of storms or sudden weather. Commonly referred to in the plural, Tempestates.
  • Zeus, Greek thunder/lightning and sky god and king of the gods

Western Asia[edit]

Anatolian-Caucasian[edit]

  • Tamar (goddess), Georgian virgin goddess who controlled the weather.
  • Tarḫunna, Hittite storm god; other Anatolian languages had similar names for their storm gods, such as Luwian below.
  • Tarḫunz, Luwian storm god.
  • Teshub, Hurrian storm god.
  • Theispas or Teisheba, the Urartian storm and war god.
  • Vayu, Hindu/Vedic wind god.
  • Weather god of Nerik, Hittite god of the weather worshiped in the village of Nerik.
  • Weather god of Zippalanda, Hittite god of the weather worshiped in the village of Zippalanda.

Hindu-Vedic[edit]

  • Indra, Hindu thunder/lightning god. Also known as the King of gods.
  • Mariamman, Hindu rain goddess.

Persian-Zoroastrian[edit]

  • Vayu-Vata, Iranian duo of gods, the first is the god of wind, much like the Hindu Vayu.

Uralic[edit]

Asia-Pacific / Oceania[edit]

Chinese[edit]

Filipino[edit]

  • Oden, the Bugkalot deity of the rain, worshiped for the deity's life-giving waters[6]
  • Apo Tudo, the Ilocano deity of the rain[7]
  • Anitun Tauo, the Sambal goddess of wind and rain who was reduced in rank by Malayari for her conceit[8]
  • Anitun Tabu, the Tagalog goddess of wind and rain and daughter of Idianale and Dumangan[9]
  • Bulan-hari, one of the Tagalog deities sent by Bathala to aid the people of Pinak; can command rain to fall; married to Bitu-in[10]
  • Santonilyo, a Bisaya deity who brings rain when its image is immersed at sea[11]
  • Diwata Kat Sidpan, a Tagbanwa deity who lives in the western region called Sidpan;[12] controls the rains[13]
  • Diwata Kat Libatan, a Tagbanwa deity who lives in the eastern region called Babatan;[14] controls the rain[15]
  • Diwata na Magbabaya, simply referred as Magbabaya, the good Bukidnon supreme deity and supreme planner who looks like a man; created the earth and the first eight elements, namely bronze, gold, coins, rock, clouds, rain, iron, and water; using the elements, he also created the sea, sky, moon, and stars; also known as the pure god who wills all things; one of three deities living in the realm called Banting[16]
  • Anit: also called Anitan; the Manobo guardian of the thunderbolt[17]
  • Inaiyau: the Manobo god of storms[18]
  • Tagbanua: the Manobo god of rain[19]
  • Umouiri: the Manobo god of clouds[20]
  • Libtakan: the Manobo god of sunrise, sunset, and good weather[21]

Japanese[edit]

  • Fūjin, Japanese wind god.
  • Raijin, Japanese god of thunder, lightning, and storms
  • Susanoo, tempestuous Japanese god of storms and the sea.

Oceania[edit]

Native Americas[edit]

Central America and the Caribbean[edit]

  • Chaac, Maya rain god. Aztec equivalent is Tlaloc.
  • Coatrisquie, Taíno rain goddess, servant of Guabancex, and sidekick of thunder god Guatauva.
  • Cocijo, Zapotec god of lightning.
  • Ehecatl, Aztec god of wind.
  • Guabancex, top Taíno storm goddess; the Lady of the Winds who also dishes out earthquakes and other natural disasters.
  • Guatauva, Taíno god of thunder and lightning who is also responsible for rallying the other storm gods.
  • Huracán, K'iche Maya god of wind, storms, and fire.
  • Juracán, Taíno zemi or deity of chaos and disorder believed to control the weather, particularly hurricanes
  • K'awiil, classic Maya god of lightning.
  • Q'uq'umatz, K'iche Maya god of wind and rain, also known as Kukulkan, Aztec equivalent is Quetzalcoatl
  • Tezcatlipoca, Aztec god of hurricanes and night winds.
  • Tlaloc, Aztec rain and earthquake god. Mayan equivalent is Chaac.
  • Tohil, K'iche Maya god of rain, sun, and fire.
  • Tupã, the Guaraní god of thunder and light. Creator of the universe.
  • Yopaat, a Classic-period Maya storm god.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^Scheffer, Johannes (1674). The History of Lapland. Oxford
  2. ^Eesti Keele Instituut (Eesti Teaduste Akadeemia); Eesti Rahvaluule Arhiiv (1 January 2004). Folklore: electronic journal of folklore. The Institute. Retrieved 19 August 2012.
  3. ^Orel (2003:429)
  4. ^Paul-Marie Duval. 2002. Les Dieux de la Gaule. Paris, Éditions Payot.
  5. ^Orel (2003:429)
  6. ^Wilson, L. L. (1947). Ilongot Life and Legends. Southeast Asia Institute.
  7. ^Llamzon, Teodoro A. 1978. Handbook of Philippine language groups. Quezon City, Philippines: Ateneo de Manila University Press.
  8. ^Jocano, F. L. (1969). Philippine Mythology. Quezon City: Capitol Publishing House Inc.
  9. ^Jocano, F. L. (1969). Philippine Mythology. Quezon City: Capitol Publishing House Inc.
  10. ^Eugenio, D. L. (2013). Philippine Folk Literature: The Legends. Quezon City: University of the Philippines Press
  11. ^San Agustín, G. (1998). Conquistas de las Islas Filipinas, 1565–1615 (Spanish Edition): Bilingual ed edition. San Agustin Museum.
  12. ^Filipino Heritage: The metal age in the Philippines (1977). Manila: Lahing Pilipino Pub.
  13. ^Fox, R. B. (1982). Religion and Society Among the Tagbanuas of Palawan Island, Philippines. Manila: National Museum.
  14. ^Filipino Heritage: The metal age in the Philippines (1977). Manila: Lahing Pilipino Pub.
  15. ^Fox, R. B. (1982). Religion and Society Among the Tagbanuas of Palawan Island, Philippines. Manila: National Museum.
  16. ^Unabia, C. C. (1986). THe Bukidnon Batbatonon and Pamuhay: A Socio-Literary Study. Quezon City : UP Press.
  17. ^Jocano, F. L. (1969). Philippine Mythology. Quezon City: Capitol Publishing House Inc.
  18. ^Jocano, F. L. (1969). Philippine Mythology. Quezon City: Capitol Publishing House Inc.
  19. ^Jocano, F. L. (1969). Philippine Mythology. Quezon City: Capitol Publishing House Inc.
  20. ^Jocano, F. L. (1969). Philippine Mythology. Quezon City: Capitol Publishing House Inc.
  21. ^Jocano, F. L. (1969). Philippine Mythology. Quezon City: Capitol Publishing House Inc.

Further reading[edit]

  • Holtom, D. C. "The Storm God Theme in Japanese Mythology." Sociologus, Neue Folge / New Series, 6, no. 1 (1956): 44-56. www.jstor.org/stable/43643852.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weather_god


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