Easy eagle required merit badges

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13 Eagle Required Merit Badges

Scoutles.com – It’s clear, some Eagle-required merit badges are more challenging to make than others. If you have an interest in difficulty rankings as well as suggestions of when to complete each Eagle-required merit badge, you remain in the best place!

Some Eagle-required badges are commonly completed throughout army tasks or classes, which is something I took into consideration when ranking their difficulty.

The greater the ranking, the more job outside of Scouting you’ll likely require to do to finish the badge. Simply since a badge is tough, doesn’t indicate it won’t also be enjoyable.

Better down in this article, you can additionally read my summaries of each badge, the reasoning behind my difficulty ranking, as well as discover a web link to a lot of the Eagle-required merit badge’s full overviews to completing the worksheet knowledge requirements.

13 Merit Badges needed to reach the rank of Eagle Scout:

  • First Aid
  • Emergency Preparedness
  • Citizenship in the Community
  • Citizenship in the Nation
  • Citizenship in the World
  • Communication
  • Personal Fitness
  • Environmental Science
  • Sustainability
  • Personal Management
  • Family Life
  • Swimming
  • Hiking
  • Cycling
  • Cooking
  • Camping
  • Lifesaving

If there’s an excellent order for precursors to finish their Eagle-required merit badges, you could also be questioning. There is! As an Eagle Scout who’s made every badge noted besides Sustainability and Cycling, I ‘d strongly recommend finishing the badges in a specific order.

I’ll be grouping all 13 Eagle-required badges into 3 categories: Badges that ought to be finished by younger scouts (Under 15), badges that must be completed by scouts around the age of 15, as well as badges that are best suited for older precursors (Aged 15+).

Eagle-Required Merit Badges For Younger Scouts (Under 15)

For younger scouts under 15, it is suitable to take 4 of the 6 types of the merit badges. Starting from:

  • First Aid
  • Cooking
  • Camping
  • Swimming or Hiking or Cycling

1. First Aid

first aid eagle required merit badge

Overview: The First Aid merit badge educates scouts the skills needed to offer aid, must they witness a clinical emergency situation. Aid is commonly one of the first Eagle-required badges most scouts earn, and for good reason. Having detailed expertise in First Aid will certainly make future activities in Scouting much safer!
General Difficulty: 5
The First Aid badge can generally be finished during troop or Summer season camp classes. First Aid has a total of 14 requirements, many of these are knowledge-based and also call for a minimum research study.
Hardest Requirement: You’ll need to demonstrate an appropriate CPR technique on a training device to finish requirement 7 as well as make the First Aid merit badge. This can usually just be done during an official CPR accreditation program.

2. Camping

camping eagle required merit badges

Overview: A great mix of activities, as well as understanding requirements, the Camping merit badge, will show scouts outdoor ethics, camp safety, and also proper expedition planning. That typically indicates that you have actually reached an innovative degree in Scouting if you can make the camping badge.
Overall Difficulty: 6
You’ve probably attended sufficient camps to finish the most difficult part of the Camping merit badge if you’ve been in Scouting for at the very least a fifty percent and also a year. After that, gaining this badge will certainly be all about acquiring more camping expertise and experience.
Hardest Requirement: You’re required to camp a total of 20 nights to complete need 9 of the camping merit badge. You’ll additionally need to join some camping experiences of your selection, such as rappelling or snowshoeing. If you have actually been in Scouting for a while, this should be rather very easy.

3. Cooking

cooking campfire eagle required

Overview: After you have actually obtained some experience camping, it’ll be a good concept to make your Cooking merit badge. Cooking educates you on correct nourishment, food storage, and also culinary security skills, in addition to just how to cook a camp menu, of course. Cooking is often the initial Eagle-required merit badge that looks earn by themselves, without the help of army classes or events.
Total Difficulty: 5
To earn the Cooking merit badge, you’ll need to make a variety of dishes in a variety of situations. You also should learn and also understand the solution to lots of food-safety expertise requirements. If you’ve camped typically however, the meals and this badge are rather simple to complete.
Hardest Requirement: The Cooking merit badge’s requirement 5 has you making 3 camp meals for your patrol or a group of approximately 8 individuals. You’ll need to make the 3rd meal using either a Dutch oven, an aluminum foil pack, or skewers. I hope you’re as starving to gain the Cooking badge as they are for supper!

4. Swimming or Hiking or Cycling

hiking eagle required

Overview: Gaining any one of these badges will certainly test your physical fitness and endurance. The reason they’re ideal for more youthful scouts though is that they’re normally done as troop activities. Swimming will likely be the easiest badge to make, as it is typically offered as a class during longer summer season camps.
Overall Difficulty: 5, 8, and 9
Do not assume they’ll be a simple walk in the park just because these badges are done as troop tasks. Hiking and also Cycling is no joke, and you’ll need good swimming skills to make the Swimming merit badge.
Hardest Requirement: Need 3 for the Swimming merit badge has you demonstrating different strokes for 150 yards. If you’re able to swim this won’t be also tough. The hardest need for Cycling will certainly be to finish a 20-mile hike. For Cycling, you’ll require to finish a 50-mile bike ride.

Eagle-Required Merit Badges To Earn Around Age 15

For scouts Around Age 15, it is suitable to take 5 of the 7 types of the merit badges. Starting from :

  • Citizenship in the Community
  • Citizenship in the Nation
  • Citizenship in the World
  • Emergency Preparedness or Lifesaving
  • Environmental Science or Sustainability

1. Citizenship in the Community

citizen in the community eagle required

Overview: If you’ve reached the center of your Scouting occupation, it’s about time you earn the Citizenship merit badges. Citizenship in the Community will aid precursors to recognize their federal government on a neighborhood degree, as well as identify means to sustain organizations benefiting their community.
Total Difficulty: 8
Frequently taken into consideration the most difficult citizenship merit badge to complete, Citizenship in the Community mainly calls for Scouts to complete projects, volunteer in their community, and comprehend numerous expertise requirements.
Hardest Requirement: To complete requirement 7, you’ll require to offer with an organization helping your community for an overall of 8 hours. You’ll likewise need to go to various other local events as well as create a discussion to display distinct aspects of your community.

2. Citizenship in the Nation

citizen in the nation eagle required

Overview: The Citizenship in the Nation merit badge teaches precursors regarding the rights and also duties of people citizens. In completing this badge, scouts will additionally learn about the history and also a present-day feature of the American federal government on a nationwide degree.
General Difficulty: 7
Citizenship in the Nation generally requires you to learn and understand our government’s standard features, as well as should not be too difficult to finish. You’ll additionally require to work on a few projects such as exploring a nationwide center and also creating a letter to a chosen official.
Hardest Requirement: Requirement 8 is most likely one of the toughest part of the Citizenship in the Nation merit badge, as it requires you to write a letter to among your district’s elected officials. Later, you’ll likewise require to go over any type of feedback you receive with your counselor.

I suggest scouts finish the Citizenship badges around the age of 15, as they’ll have most likely taken classes in school, such as world history and civics, that would certainly provide a great history to gain these sorts of badges.

3. Citizenship in the World

citizenship in the world eagle required

Overview: Citizenship worldwide will show precursors about the different companies that help to promote international law. Precursors will certainly additionally learn about different cultures and also international events, with any luck ending up being extra open-minded and approving of all individuals in our world.
Total Difficulty: 6
Citizenship in the World is typically taken into consideration the most straightforward Citizenship merit badge and will primarily evaluate your capability to address understanding requirements. The whole badge can be researched and completed in one resting if you’re committed enough.
Hardest Requirement: To complete Citizenship in the World requirement 3, you’ll need to look into an existing globe concern along with the different nations entailed. This will take a good understanding of geography as well as politics, which is why I recommend this badge for Scouts that have already taken world history and geography classes.

4. Emergency Preparedness or Lifesaving

emergency preparedness for natural disaster

Overview: When offered the option to make either Emergency Preparedness or Lifesaving, a lot of scouts make Emergency Preparedness, as Emergency Preparedness can be finished individually and shows the skills essential to react and also stop to different kinds of dilemmas.

Most Lifesaving requirements need to be finished in a pool with qualified lifeguard guidance. In making Lifesaving, a scout will learn how to deal with various types of water emergencies.
General Difficulty: 5 and 6
Emergency Preparedness mainly consists of simple knowledge requirements but needs a scout to make their First Aid merit badge ahead of time. For Lifesaving, a scout has to show various swimming and also rescue strategies in the water. Be alerted, Lifesaving is harder to earn than the Swimming merit badge.
Hardest Requirement For Emergency Preparedness: To finish requirement 1 of Emergency Preparedness, you’ll first need to gain the First Aid merit badge. Additionally, you’ll also require to participate in an emergency solution job with your Scouting unit or a community agency to complete need 7.
Hardest Requirement For Lifesaving: Requirement 1 of the Lifesaving badge requires you to swim continuously for 400 yards while demonstrating numerous strokes. Beyond this, you’ll also require to reveal confidence in the water by finishing various water rescue exercises.

5. Environmental Science or Sustainability

Environmental Science Eagle Required Merit Badges

Overview: Both the Sustainability and Environmental Science merit badges will certainly educate you on important abilities concerning just how to conserve resources as well as safeguard the natural ecosystem. However, while Sustainability offers extra with decreasing waste in your household. Environmental Science will educate you about the science behind the manner in which humans interact with nature.
Overall Difficulty: 8 and 9
Both Environmental Science and also Sustainability are tricky badges that are generally dealt with independently. For either selection, you’ll have a well-balanced mix of experiments and also understanding requirements to complete. Via your experiments, you’ll create a comprehensive understanding of how your activities impact the environment.
Hardest Requirement For Environmental Science: Requirement 3 of the Environmental Science merit badge will certainly offer you the choice to either conduct experiments or write records. Requirement 4 will certainly have you perform an experiment by observing a plot of land. Both of these jobs are difficult as well as will certainly take a minimum of one week to finish.
Hardest Requirement For Sustainability: Requirement 2 of the Sustainability merit badge will be tough. You’ll require to make numerous strategies to execute sustainability right into your family by reducing your water, food, and also energy waste. At a minimum, this set requirement will certainly take at the very least a month to carry out and complete.

Eagle-Required Merit Badges For Older Scouts (Over 15)

A quick note, I have actually saved these badges for older precursors since they’re typically done individually and handle subjects that are much more complex and also ‘adult’.

You earn merit badges to learn life abilities, so to get the most out of Scouting, I ‘d very recommend you wait up until you’re 15 before beginning any one of the following badges.

For older scouts over 15, it is suitable to take 4 types of merit badges. Starting from:

  • Personal Management
  • Personal Fitness
  • Family Life
  • Communication

1. Personal Management

Overview: The Personal Management merit badge will gear up precursors with the ability to manage their financial resources as young people. To earn this badge, you’ll need to track your budget for three months, in addition, to identify the answers to different knowledge requirements. Personal Management is among one of the most useful merit badges and also has several real-world applications.
Total Difficulty: 8
It’ll take initiative and willpower to finish the Personal Management merit badge. Requiring a detailed understanding of various financial terms, as well as the conclusion of a few projects, Personal Management is quickly among one of the hardest Eagle-required merit badges.
Hardest Requirement: Requirement 2 asks you to produce a spending plan and also track your expenditures for a period of 13 consecutive weeks. Outside of that, you’ll require to do hours of research to finish the financial knowledge requirements.

2. Personal Fitness

Overview: Personal Fitness is a time-consuming merit badge, however, it will be a lot easier if you take part in any institution sports. In making Personal Fitness, you’ll find out the appropriate way to care for your body, pick nutritious foods, as well as continue to be healthy. You’ll additionally create as well as adhere to a regular workout plan.
General Difficulty: 8
Given that a lot of the personal fitness requirements are about you, this merit badge usually isn’t also difficult for the majority of scouts to gain. The hardest part will certainly be to adhere to fitness as well as create a routine for 3 months. If you’re taking a PE class, this requirement comes to be much less complicated to complete.
Hardest Requirement: Requirements 7 and 8 ask you to detail a fitness program to adhere to over the span of 12 weeks. You’ll need to maintain a regular log of your tasks and results, coming along in various health and fitness categories.

3. Family Life

Overview: The Family Life merit badge instructs precursors the relevance of cooperation within a household, along with some key abilities required to one day, start their own family members. This badge is best matched for older scouts that face greater responsibilities in and also beyond their households.
Overall Difficulty: 7
While the requirements for Family Life aren’t also tough, you’ll still require to be on top of things to successfully complete this badge. Along with discussing various topics with your parents, you’re likewise be tracking your home duties, producing a project for your household, and also holding a family members meeting.
Hardest Requirement: For most scouts earning the Family Life merit badge, requirement 3 will certainly be one of the most difficult. Requirement 3 has you track as well as a total of at least 5 regular jobs throughout at the very least 90 days. By remaining on top of your routine, you’ll develop organizational skills and guarantee your plans prosper.

4. Communication

Overview: The Communication merit badge will show precursors to structure their thoughts as well as speak articulately. To complete this badge, scouts have to investigate the communication styles of themselves and also others, inevitably using these skills to hold an occasion and present on behalf of their troop.
Overall Difficulty: 9
Communication is often among the last merit badges that Eagle Precursors earn, and also forever reason. It’s tough! In between offering presentations, carrying out meetings, and also creating written web content, Communication is most likely among one of the hardest merit badges a Scout can earn.
Hardest Requirement: Requirements 2-8 will have you scripting and intending events, attending regional meetings, and also providing on several events.

Ideally, you’re now prepared to go out and gain each of these badges! The website is a work in development, so I’ll be servicing finishing the remainder of the Eagle-required merit badge guides in the following few months.

The difficulty scores I’ve consisted of originated from the experiences I’ve had in Scouting, in addition to the input of various other scouts online website.

Hans Curt

I might be a Mechanical Engineer on the paper, but I was an Eagle Scout enthusiast since childhood.

Sours: https://scoutles.com/eagle-required-merit-badges/

 Level 1 – easiest badges to complete (great for 1st year scouts)

Art – (5) simple requirements that can be done in an afternoon.

Basketry – Can get expensive if you buy the BSA kits, but probably a lot more difficult to do on your own.

Canoeing – Definitely a summer camp badge. Have fun swamping your boat!

Fingerprinting – Easiest of the easy. There’s a reason that so many of these badges get done. Do yourself a favor, though, and do this through your sheriff’s office. Much more interesting. Or, here’s an online course specific to the badge.

Fire Safety – The hardest part of this badge is demonstrating the different fires. Beyond that, it can be completed in a couple of days.

Golf – Could be done in a single day if you already know how to play golf, or if you have a good instructor. More fun to stretch it out over several rounds.

Painting – The only hard thing is tinting the white base. Everything else is easy.

Pulp and Paper – Make your own paper. Great to do just before Mother’s Day.

Reading – Takes awhile to finish, but is basically a library trip, a lot of reading, and some community service.

Sculpture – Wonderfully fun badge that can be earned in a day except you might have to let your project dry awhile before painting.

Wood Carving – Scout kits make it easy.


Level 2 – not too difficult

American Labor – A lot to digest, but you’ll learn something while doing it.

Architecture – A brief overview. Only difficult part is the interview with a practicing architect.

Bird Study – Actually a very cool badge to work on. A lot of requirements, but simple ones.

Chess – IF you already participate in Scholastic Chess or play regularly, the most difficult part of this will be finding a Scout you can teach. Note: National clarified that it must be a Boy Scout orVenturer, and it must be someone who does not know how to play at all.

Cinematography – Hardest part is finding someone who knows what they’re talking about to be the counselor.

Climbing – It seems like most indoor climbing gyms now offer this as a one-day badge. Fast and easy for fifty bucks, or one step at a time on campouts for much less.

Coin Collecting – Money, money, money. Again, a lot to do, but all easy.

Collections – You can’t use stamps or coins, but just about anything else will do! Almost in the Easy category.

Crime Prevention – You don’t have to be Chuck Norris to fight crime. A lot of “discuss” that isn’t too difficult.

Dentistry – The hardest part about this is making an appointment to see the dentist. It’s an interesting badge, especially if you come prepared with a lot of questions for your dentist.

Disabilities Awareness – Close to moderate because of the visits involved. If you don’t have a Scout with a disability in your troop, you’ll need to call around.

Energy – A whole lot to do, but none is difficult. Keep it in a notebook to make sure you have everything.

Fishing – Requires knot-tying and actually catching fish, so the difficulty depends upon you.

Genealogy – Hardest part is interviewing family members and gathering all the information. If you make the required visit beforehand, this is a good one for a Merit Badge Clinic.

Graphic Arts – An easy one if you’re computer savvy and artistic.

Leatherwork – Get a kit and you’re pretty well set. You’ll definitely need the book for this one.

Mammal Study – Almost easy. The best option is the photography one, since you can use those photos for Photography as well.

Motorboating – Easy if you are already 1st class. Otherwise, you’ll have to learn the First Aid requirements and pass the swimmer test. On the water is the fun part!

Music – Difficulty depends upon which options you choose. Requires a concert. Can be a long badge, but not hard.

Pets – If you have a pet and you’re responsible for feeding it, this is super easy. Just make sure you keep a record for 3 months, and find a place to show it (or teach it three tricks, if it’s teachable).

Photography – Perfect if you’ve had a photography class; if not, you’ll probably want to do a lot of reading to know exactly how the camera works. This is a fun badge. You can also combine it with other badges — like the photo display for Citizenship in the Community or the Mammal Study badge.

Plumbing – You’ll need to find someone who knows what they’re doing, but if you can get your plumber to let you shadow him for a day, this is a good one.

Safety – Easy except figuring out what to do for the Safety Project.

Scholarship – Especially easy for homeschooled Scouts since you won’t have to visit the principal’s office. The 250 word report is the only pain.

Textile – Doesn’t have to be girly. Textiles can also include fleece, wool, and cotton.

Theater – Be in a play, earn a badge. Kind of surprised to see this as a Merit Badge, but the mime part can be funny.

Weather – If you have a weather service office nearby, this can be very cool. The only requirement that isn’t interesting or fun is that you have to give a 5-minute speech from an outline.


Level 3 – moderate difficulty

American Cultures – A really interesting one. Time ranges depending upon your choices. Requires visits.

American Heritage – A lot of requirements that are best done one at a time. Get an award at the same time by doing just a little more – Youth Patriotism Award.

Animal Science – Easy if you live on a farm; else trying to convince Mom to let you raise a chicken might be somewhat of a chore.

Archery – A good camp badge; if you miss out at camp, you’ll need to find an archery range. The qualifying score is what moves this to the moderate category.

Astronomy – The visit or Star party is some work; most of this is right out of a good astronomy book.

Athletics – Takes 4 months in a sport, and you can’t use the same time period that you do for Sports.

Aviation – Building the model is the most difficult part, but at least the badge has interesting requirements.

Backpacking – If your troop is active in backpacking and camping, this shouldn’t be too hard. If not, your patrol might need to schedule a few weekends out.

Communications (E) – Basic common sense. Easy if you’ve already done public speaking. Can be a lot of fun with the right group.

Composite Materials – Hard part is finding a qualified counselor; some of the troops do neat things like make skateboards.

Computers – Ranges from 2-4 depending upon who is teaching it. If you spend a significant amount of time on the computer already, shouldn’t be too difficult.

Cooking – Open right away, since you’ll do most of the requirements while camping.

Dog Care – The three months and the waste cleanup are what make this moderate. If you already have a dog, it’s mostly your normal chores.

Drafting – Difficulty varies widely depending upon merit badge counselor interpretation of the requirements. Interesting and useful.

Electricity – If you have somebody helping you that knows what they’re doing, this isn’t too difficult. It’s very interesting, and a fun badge. Use the online module at emeritbadges.org to make this make more sense.

Electronics – Not so hard if you’re already familiar with electronics; if you’re coming in blind (like me, David), it takes a bit more work to fully grasp. Another IEEE badge.

Environmental Science (E) – A lot of observing involved, but not terribly long or difficult. Make sure to read the book because the experiments are in it. Don’t do this at camp unless you have a good instructor. Ones who skirt the requirements only cheat you.

Farm Mechanics – Again, finding a good counselor for this who has a farm is the hard part. The implement dealer interview was interesting.

Fish & Wildlife Management – Requires a visit and building a bird feeder, but everything else can be done inside. Do with Bird Study.

Fly Fishing – Not as easy as you think! Requires knots, proper technique, and catching two fish. If you can, combine it with Fishing since they overlap.

Forestry – Because of where we live, this is *almost* in the Easy category. Requires visits and a lot of collection and identification, but is a great outdoorsy badge.

Gardening – Requires a visit, and growing a garden. Depending upon the color of your thumb, this could be very difficult or very easy.

Geocaching – So much fun! Requires someone to drive you around. Req 9 can be a difficult one (planning a hunt). If a lot of Scouts are working on the badge at the same time, consider setting up a basic hunt for your Cubs.

Geology – This is good to open before you do Earth Science in school, or see if you can get a geologist at a museum to volunteer to be your counselor.

Horsemanship – To really do this right, try taking lessons for a few months.

Indian Lore – If you live near a reservation (like WE do), this can be pretty easy! The only thing that moves it out of Easy is needing to teach other Scouts or give a presentation. Here are some of my Indian Place Names for requirement 4g.

Landscape Architecture – What makes this more difficult than some is finding a landscape architect that you can shadow.

Law – Requires interview and visit. Just make sure you’re not being charged $160/hr.

Lifesaving – Not too hard if you’re a good swimmer and have your Swimming badge.

Model Design and Boatbuilding – Depending upon your dexterity, could be very easy… or not. A trebuchet takes care of req. 4c, but your SM probably won’t let you launch it at Scouts.

Nature – Takes a long time if you keep ants for a season, but a well-designed and thorough badge. Hint: meal worms hatch quickly.

Orienteering – Not too hard if you have an Orienteering club in your area. Otherwise, you’ll get a lot of practice setting up your own.

Personal Fitness (E) – Not difficult, just takes effort and a long time to do it. Probably best for older Scouts to do.

Pioneering – Knots, knots, and more knots. This is a lot of fun, especially if you can do it at a Camporee.

Pottery – Some similarities to Sculpture; if you do this at a studio, you can likely do them together.

Public Health – Easily one of the least favorite badges. Requires a visit to a government health agency, plus you might not agree with everything that’s in the book. If your parent is the counselor, that’s the best way to go for this. Some of the “discuss” portions aren’t really appropriate.

Public Speaking – Requires being brave enough to talk in front of people.

Radio – If you use the online module, this is pretty easy to understand. Requires a visit. Do this at the same time as the Electronics badge.

Railroading – Requires a visit, but everything else can easily be done at a model railroad club or show.

Reptile & Amphibian Study – Creepy crawlies. Hard part is getting Mom to let you keep one for a month.

 

Rifle Shooting – A great badge! Don’t forget to review the safety aspects thoroughly and look for Hunting Rifles for Sale, then have fun!

Rowing – Gently down the stream… It’s the CPR requirement that puts this in the moderate category.

Skating – If you already skate, this is only a matter of having your counselor watch. It might take awhile to learn the tricks if you don’t. Inline requirements are easier than quads.

Small-Boat Sailing – Best done at camp. Capsizing the boat is the most fun.

Space Exploration – Shoot off a rocket! A lot of reading, but once you know what you’re doing, the rocket is the best part.

Stamp Collecting – Fun badge. The only thing that makes this moderate is trying to find an expert to go to a show with you.

Traffic Safety – The photos of the wrecks were gruesome, but the actual requirements are far less than the state’s drivers’ exam books.

Truck Transportation – No, you don’t get to drive one. But it does require a visit to a truck terminal.

Veterinary Medicine – Requires a vet visit; a good one to do if you’re taking in your pet anyway.

Watersports – Getting up isn’t the problem, it’s jumping the wakes that might give some difficulty.

Welding – Something that every Scout should try. If you can get a qualified welder to teach you, this badge can be done in about 8-10 hours of instruction time. Definitely not for Scouts with short attention spans or safety violations in their recent past.

Woodworking – Easier if you have the tools; otherwise, you’ll need to find a place that will let you work on projects. If you have Shop in school, should be a cinch.


Level 4 – difficult or very time-consuming badges

Auto Mechanics – It’s a lot to remember, and most of the requirements are “demonstrate”.

Camping (E) – It’s not the actual camping, but the 20 nights and making sure some of the campouts fit the specific requirements. Open it as soon as you join Scouts.

Chemistry – Tedious for those of us who don’t like chemistry. Requires a visit. Not as difficult for science geeks (and I say that respectfully).

Citizenship in the Community (E) – Requires interviews, visits, and a public presentation. Yes, if you do it RIGHT, this is a hard badge. If you just want to get it over with and don’t really care about learning something, you can probably do it in three weeks. Need (8) community service hours.

Citizenship in the Nation (E) – Make sure to allow sufficient time to really go through the Constitution. A good badge to do with your American Government class. Requires visits. (Jordon and David logged 36 class hours each for this badge!)

Citizenship in the World (E) – *IF* you do it right, this should take a few months to complete. I know some camps offer it in a day, but what are you really getting out of it in a day?

Cycling (E) – The requirements aren’t that difficult, but it does require 7 different rides, including a 50-miler with time constraints. If you can’t swim very well, this is a good alternative.

Emergency Preparedness (E) – The best way to do this is to pair up with your local government emergency management division, so that you can do a real drill with them. This badge takes a lot of planning to do on your own.

Engineering – A little dry, but if you have the right counselor, the hands-on part can be fun.

Entrepreneurship – Requires interviews, reports, but the hard part of this is running a business.

Family Life (E) – Could be a (3) if you’re a self-starter. For some of us, it just seems to take forever.

First Aid (E) – A lot of requirements, but interesting. Taking a CPR course and a First Aid course will get most of the requirements marked off.

Hiking (E) – The hard part is the 20-mile hike. Takes awhile to get in the (5) 10-milers, but enjoyable.

Home Repairs – A lot of different things involved. You might do this as a group, and offer to repair a senior’s home in your area.

Insect Study – Would be easy except the mounting of 50 bugs. A lot of fun.

Journalism – Watch tv and get a badge. Not really, but you do have to watch the tube or read a paper. The television option is especially fun. Requires a visit and interview.

Kayaking – Time-consuming — BUT here’s the thing: If you do the kayaking option for the whitewater badge, and earn the Kayaking BSA award, this is almost a gimme. If you’re going to either one of the badges, combine it with the other. A little extra and you’ll earn both (and the award).

Medicine – A lot of “discuss” and “tell”, but also requires a doctor visit and medical volunteer hours.

Metalwork – Can get expensive, depending upon which option you choose. The work doesn’t seem that hard, but it’s finding a metalworker to supervise and teach that might be a problem.

Nuclear Science – Learn how safe, efficient, and inexpensive nuclear power is. Requirements vary, but hopefully include a visit (difficult post 9-11).

Oceanography – Requires a 500-word report or a 5-minute speech. Yuck. Otherwise, very interesting badge.

Personal Management (E) – Time-consuming, but not overly difficult.

Plant Science – TONS of requirements. The “Field Botany” option is a lot easier than the other two.

Robotics – Because of the cost of the equipment involved, this will probably best be done as part of a Robotics club.

Salesmanship – A good one to do if your Troop does any kind of door-to-door selling (popcorn, anyone?). Easy if it’s natural for you; extremely difficult for those of us for whom it’s not.

Shotgun Shooting – The hard part of this is getting a good enough score to pass. Otherwise, it’s a blast.

Snow Sports – If you don’t already ski or snowboard, the level of proficiency might take a little while. Try the option you are most interested in, and switch if you find it’s not going to work. Different muscles for each of the options, and personality comes in to play.

Soil and Water Conservation – This is a fun one, but there’s a lot involved including visits and written reports.

Sports – Not difficult, but you have to be on two different sports teams for a season each in order to qualify, so it can take a long time.

Surveying – The badge isn’t difficult — but finding someone who really knows what they’re doing is.

Swimming (E) – A lot to learn, but it’s one of the most important things here.

Whitewater– Someone want to explain how a “Class I” river qualifies as Whitewater?? Good one to do at the same time as the BSA Kayak Award. Difficult because you have to have CPR card and Canoeing badge (or Kayak BSA) to even start it.

Wilderness Survival – The ultimate Boy Scout badge. Every single Scout should prepare for and earn this one. Should be one of the Eagle-requireds.


Level 5 – for the die-hard!

American Business – Another one requiring a business, and no, you can’t use the same three months for different badges. Lots of visits and reports. Good if you have a high school business course, though.

Archaeology – A lot of requirements, a lot of work, reports, plus you need to be able to find a dig to volunteer at. Who does these? Update: What a find! We were blessed enough to be able to actually work on a dig! Still a very difficult badge, but we learned a LOT.

Bugling – Unless you’re already used to playing a brass instrument, the required calls are fairly difficult to master. You can use a trumpet instead (easier). Still have to serve as bugler for three months in your troop. Plan to start this early because it took us 8 months and 10 months to complete.

Scuba – Most difficult badge of them all for anyone 15 and older. Requires NAUI or PADI adult certification. Expensive and a lot of work. Really good skill to have, though. If you do this before you turn 15, you can earn a *much* easier and less expensive Jr. Certification.

Sours: http://www.scouttroop120.org/?p=1954
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EagleCoach.org

Of the 21 merit badges that a Scout must earn before achieving the rank of Eagle Scout, 13 are required.  That means only 8 of the 21 merit badges are elective.  If you are a Scout that intends to earn Eagle Rank, then it is a good idea to concentrate on the 13 Eagle-Required merit badges starting early in your Scouting career.  The electives will fall into place as you attend summer camp or perhaps other events.  So, keep focused on these important 13 Eagle-required merit badges and not the electives.

Let’s talk about those 13 merit badges, and perhaps the best time and place to earn them.

Swimming, Environmental Science, Communications, First Aid, Cooking, Lifesaving:  No better place than summer camp.  If you are a swimmer, you will be passing a swimming test your first day at camp.  Might as well keep going and get the Swimming merit badge!  (If you are not a swimmer, this is absolutely the best place to learn.  I taught swimming to non-swimmers as a lifeguard at a Scout camp many years ago.  I had every boy swimming within a week.)  Many camps have an age limit for Lifesaving, so this might be delayed until your third or fourth season at summer camp.  There are alternatives for Swimming and Lifesaving, but I personally recommend these two merit badges.  I believe that every person should know how to swim, and also how to rescue someone in the water.  Environmental Science, First Aid, Cooking and Communications are also a natural for camp, and all three should be earned early on your advancement trail.  Not a bad idea to use four of these merit badges for your Star advancement.

Family Life is a merit badge that should be earned as young Scout.  It is fairly easy, requiring a couple of family projects and a family meeting.  (This is one of the “90-day” merit badges.  You must keep a record of your chores for 90 days, so there is no way to earn the merit badge in less than that time.  If you are seventeen years old and have not earned this merit badge, you MUST start the merit badge at least three months before your 18th birthday, or you will not be able to earn Eagle Rank.)

Citizenship in the Community, Citizenship in the Nation, and Citizenship in the World:  Citizenship in the Community is a complex merit badge, requiring an interview of a public official, attendance at school or town board meeting, and eight hours of community service to an organization that you have identified and interviewed.  Citizenship in the Nation is easier, requiring only one trip, but requires a reasonable knowledge of our government and how it works.  Citizenship in the World is what I call a “homework” merit badge.  You can earn the entire merit badge by reading the merit badge pamphlet and answering the questions.  (I had one Scout earn this merit badge in one 35-minute session with me.  He was a history buff and really knew his material.)  All three citizenship merit badges can be earned at any age, but they are probably easier for a Scout of 13 years or older.

Camping:  You will earn this over the course of several years camping with your troop.  A total of 20 nights of camping are required, only 7 of which may be summer camp.  Keep good track of all your camping trips in your Scout handbook!

Personal Fitness and Personal Management:  These two merit badges are the most important ones for launching yourself into adulthood, and should be the last Eagle-required merit badges earned.  They are “real world” and require a lot of work.  And they are also the two other “90-day” merit badges, requiring a log of personal fitness activities and a journal of income and expenses for 3 months.

You can download the workbooks for all these merit badges on this website.  Go to the “Merit Badge” tab at the top, click “13 Eagle Required Merit Badges”, and then scroll down the the merit badge you want to click and download the workbook.

Sours: http://www.eaglecoach.org/merit-badges/how-to-earn-the-13-eagle-required-merit-badges/
Finding MB Opportunities - How To Begin Merit Badges

What is the easiest merit badge?

The easiest merit badges are those that you’re already working on in your everyday life. For instance, if you already have a dog, the pets merit badge would be a no-brainer. The 3 simplest merit badges that any scout can earn are Art, Fingerprinting and Photography.

What is the hardest merit badge to earn?

Often considered the most difficult citizenship merit badge to complete, Citizenship in the Community mainly requires scouts to complete projects, volunteer in their community, and understand various knowledge requirements.

How many merit badges can a Boy Scout earn?

135 merit badges

Do colleges look at Eagle Scout?

College admissions: Admissions officers recognize the award and consider it in their decisions. Being an Eagle Scout won’t make up for poor grades, but it will give an applicant an advantage. Unigo, a network for future college students, offers a list of Eagle Scout-only scholarships.

Is Bill Gates an Eagle Scout?

Although the list names Bill Gates as America’s most successful former Boy Scout, it notes that he topped out at the rank of Life Scout, just below Eagle. It was his extensive philanthropic work, however, not his basket weaving, which earned him the Boy Scouts’ highest honor, the Silver Buffalo, in 2010.

Can you earn merit badges after 18?

Yes, they can continue to earn merit badges, Eagle Palms, and other Scouts BSA awards until their 18th birthday. The only exceptions for those older than age 18 are related to Scouts registered beyond the age of eligibility (“Registering Qualified Members Beyond Age of Eligibility,” 10.1.

What happens when a boy scout turns 18?

Technically…you are no longer a youth. If you take YPT you should be fine to attend scout meetings and outings – but you need to act appropriately as an adult following YPT. You are still registered, you can wear the adult uniform at meetings. You can also register as Unit College Scouter Reserve (code 92U).

How old are you when you become an Eagle Scout?

18

Can a girl be an Eagle Scout?

Becoming an Eagle Scout is a rare honor. But they don’t just give it out — a Scout has to earn it. Two years after girls were first allowed into the Boy Scouts, almost 1,000 of them rose to the top rank of Eagle Scout.

What percentage of Boy Scouts are Mormon?

20 percent

What colleges give scholarships for Eagle Scouts?

One example is the Eagle Scout/Gold Award from the University of Mississippi. Florida Tech’s Melbourne campus also awards Eagle Scouts for scholarships. It is for any new first-year student who earned the rank of Eagle Scout. Girl Scouts with the Gold Award may also apply.

Can parents attend Boy Scout campouts?

Den leaders, pack leaders, and parents are expected to accompany the youth on approved trips. All youth registered in troops are eligible to participate in troop or patrol overnight campouts, camporees, and resident camps. Youth ages 12 through 17 are eligible to participate in national jamborees.

What are the 3 R’s of youth protection?

The “three R’s” of Youth Protection convey a simple message for the personal awareness of our youth members: Recognize that anyone could be a molester; Respond when someone is doing something that goes against your gut or against the safety guidelines; and Report attempted or actual molestation or any activity that you …

Sours: https://www.mvorganizing.org/what-is-the-easiest-merit-badge/

Badges easy merit eagle required

How to Earn Boy Scout Merit Badges

Like scouting itself, earning merit badges can be an adventure. But truth be told, some badges that are required for Eagle Scouts are considerably more fun to earn than others. Some can also be earned in a matter of days, while others take three months, minimum. And some are best done at Boy Scout camp, not at home.

Here are insider tips on how to get those Eagle-required badges done in a timely fashion, without making the process too overwhelming for the Eagle hopeful or his or her parents.

General Strategies

Earning merit badges takes time and effort. A Scout can navigate this process best when he or she makes a plan and minds important guidelines. Some overall strategies to keep in mind.

Pace the Work

Although civics, life skills, and wilderness survival comprise the knowledge base every Eagle should have, some of the Eagle-required merit badges are pretty dry affairs. Important, yes, but not necessarily thrilling.

Encourage your Scout to do two or three per year—not all 12 at once— and to accomplish as many as possible at Scout camp.

Get the OK

As for any merit badge, make sure your Scout signs up with a merit badge counselor and gets his or her "blue card"—the paperwork required for every merit badge—launched before any requirement work commences. Most troops will not give retroactive credit for merit badge work.

Do It as a Troop

Some troops hold badge-o-ramas or other day-long troop events where scouts can work on advancement projects and get one or two Eagle badges started. This is particularly helpful for badges that don't really fit the 7-day Scout camp format, such as Personal Management, Family Life, and some of the Citizenship badges.

Earning Individual Badges

These tips will help you and your prospective Eagle Scout choose which badges to go for, as well as when and where.

Camp or Badge-o-rama
  • Citizenship in the Community

  • Citizenship in the Nation

  • Communications

  • Emergency Preparedness

  • Environmental Science

  • First Aid

  • Swimming

Work on Individually
  • Citizenship in the World

  • Cycling

  • Family Life

  • Lifesaving

  • Personal Fitness

  • Personal Management

Emergency Preparedness or Lifesaving

Only one of these badges is required, but many teens find the material so fascinating and exciting they end up completing both. Emergency Preparedness is a great badge to complete at Boy Scout camp. If your child is a lifeguard, he may find Lifesaving to be the no-brainer option. Either way, this is one of those badges that kids—and parents—love.

Environmental Science

Most people find that it's best to complete this at Scout Camp. The material is vastly more interesting in the wilderness, and the environmental observation exercises can be tedious if the only "wild animals" back home consist of ants and mosquitoes.

Swimming, Hiking, or Cycling

Only one of these badges is required. If your child is a member of a swim team or goes to Scout Camp, swimming is the easiest, most straightforward choice. The hiking badge is a good option for non-swimming, nature-loving kids who enjoy serious, long-distance hikes. Don't even consider the cycling badge unless your child is a die-hard cyclist whose idea of fun is riding 20 to 30 miles every weekend.

Camping

Like the Emergency Preparedness badge, this one is beloved by nearly every Scout. Its lessons are so central to everything in Scouting, chances are that most of the requirements will be finished over the years simply as a matter of course. Like every Scout merit badge, it's critical that your child gets signed up with a merit badge counselor before any requirement work commences, or it won't count.

First Aid

This badge is one of the more interesting, action-packed badges for teens. To earn it, a Scout must master every aspect of basic injury care, from the scratches and bruises of city life to potentially life-threatening gashes, breaks, and wounds that can happen in the outback. But while it can be exciting, it's not a good one for solo work. It's best done at Scout camp or as an organized troop activity.

Citizenship in the Community/Nation/World

While the material involved in these three local, federal, and global civics badges is valuable, attempting to do all three at once is a recipe for disastrous levels of boredom. The better option is to get the community and/or nation badges started during a troop event or Scout camp and finish the work on one's own. The Citizenship in the World badge can be done entirely on one's own, with guidance from a badge counselor.

Communications

Much of the work of this badge can be done individually with guidance from a badge counselor, but one component—the speech—requires an audience, which makes it a good option for a badge-o-rama event.

Personal Fitness, Personal Management, and Family Life

All three of these "personal" badges are straightforward, important learning experiences that can be done entirely alone. Teens who are involved in high school athletics, in particular, will find personal fitness a breeze.

Where it gets tricky is that each badge requires three months of activities and record-keeping to track all that exercise, budgeting, and/or household chores. Teens typically have no quibble with the tasks—it's the tracking that gets them, and failure to stay on top of the record-keeping means having to start over. Laying out a good tracking system—an Excel spreadsheet, for example—is critical. Once in record-keeping mode, your teen may find it easier to do all three badges at once.

Thanks for your feedback!

Sours: https://www.verywellfamily.com/boy-scout-merit-badge-tips-3570422
Eagle Required Merit Badges in Boy Scouts (SMD22)

It’s no secret, some Eagle-required merit badges are harder to earn than others. If you’re interested in difficulty rankings and recommendations of when to complete each Eagle-required merit badge, you’re in the right place!

A number of Eagle-required badges are completed during troop activities or classes, which is a fact I took into account when rating their difficulty. The higher the ranking, the more work outside of Scouting you’ll likely need to do to complete the badge. However, just because a badge is difficult, doesn’t mean it won’t also be fun.

Further down in this article, you can also read my descriptions of each badge, the reasoning behind my difficulty rating, as well as find a link to many of the Eagle-required merit badge’s full guides to completing the worksheet knowledge requirements. 🙂

Without further ado, the 13 merit badges needed to reach the rank of Eagle Scout and their difficulty ratings are:

You might also be wondering if there’s an ideal order for scouts to complete their Eagle-required merit badges.There is! As an Eagle Scout who’s earned every badge listed other than Sustainability and Cycling, I’d strongly recommend completing the badges in a specific order.

I’ll be grouping all 13 Eagle-required badges into 3 categories: Badges that should be completed by younger scouts (Under 15), badges that should be completed by scouts around the age of 15, and badges that are best suited for older scouts (Aged 15+).

Read through this article, and I guarantee you’ll be prepared to earn each of these merit badges and become an Eagle Scout!

Best Eagle-Required Merit Badges For Younger Scouts (Under 15)

Tip: Click the underlined badge name to check out my ultimate guides, aimed at helping you answer the knowledge requirements to each merit badge worksheet!

(More Articles Coming Soon)

First Aid

Overview: The First Aid merit badge teaches scouts the skills necessary to provide assistance, should they witness a medical emergency. First aid is typically one of the first Eagle-required badges most scouts earn, and for good reason. Having a detailed knowledge of first aid will make future activities in Scouting much safer!

Overall Difficulty: 5.
The First Aid badge can usually be completed during troop or Summer camp classes. Although First Aid has a total of 14 requirements, most of these are knowledge-based and require minimal research.

Hardest Requirement: You’ll need to demonstrate proper CPR technique on a training device to complete requirement 7 and earn the First Aid merit badge. This can typically only be done during an official CPR certification course.

Swimming or Hiking or Cycling

Overview: Earning any of these badges will undoubtedly test your physical fitness and endurance. The reason why they’re best for younger scouts though is that they’re typically done as troop activities. Swimming will likely be the easiest badge to earn, as it is often offered as a class during longer summer camps.

Overall Difficulty: 4, 9, and 9, respectively.
Don’t think they’ll be a simple walk in the park just because these badges are done as troop activities. Hiking and Cycling are no joke, and you’ll need decent swimming skills to earn the Swimming merit badge. You can click here to see a full comparison between earning Swimming, Hiking, and Cycling.

Hardest Requirement: Requirement 3 for the Swimming merit badge has you demonstrating various strokes for 150 yards. However, if you’re able to swim this won’t be too difficult. The hardest requirement for Hiking will be to complete a 20-mile hike. For Cycling, you’ll need to complete a 50-mile bike ride. Yikes!

Cooking

Overview: After you’ve gained some experience camping, it’ll be a good idea to earn your Cooking merit badge. Cooking teaches you proper nutrition, food storage, and culinary safety skills — along with how to cook a camp menu, of course. Cooking is often the first Eagle-required merit badge that scouts earn by themselves, without the help of troop classes or events.

Overall Difficulty: 7.
To earn the Cooking merit badge, you’ll need to make a number of meals in a variety of situations. You also must learn and understand the answers to many food-safety knowledge requirements. If you’ve camped often though, the meals for this badge are pretty easy to complete.

Hardest Requirement: The Cooking merit badge’s requirement 5 has you making three camp meals for your patrol or a group of up to 8 people. You’ll need to make the third meal using either a Dutch oven, a foil pack, or skewers. Hope you’re as hungry to earn the Cooking badge as they are for dinner! 🙂

Camping

Overview: A good mix of activities and knowledge requirements, the Camping merit badge will teach scouts outdoor ethics, camp safety, and proper trek planning. If you can earn the camping badge, that typically means that you’ve reached an advanced level in Scouting.

Overall Difficulty: 6.
If you’ve been in Scouting for at least a year and a half, you’ve probably attended enough camps to finish the most difficult part of the Camping merit badge. After that, earning this badge will be all about gaining more camping knowledge and experience.

Hardest Requirement: You’re required to camp a total of 20 nights to complete requirement 9 of the camping merit badge. You’ll also need to participate in some camping experiences of your choice, such as rappelling or snowshoeing. This should be pretty easy if you’ve been in Scouting for a while.

Best Eagle-Required Merit Badges To Earn Around Age 15

Emergency Preparedness or Lifesaving

Overview: When given the option to earn either Emergency Preparedness or Lifesaving, most scouts earn Emergency Preparedness, as EPrep can be completed individually and teaches the skills necessary to prevent and respond to different types of crises.

Most Lifesaving requirements must be completed in a pool with qualified lifeguard supervision. In earning Lifesaving, a scout will learn how to handle different types of aquatic emergencies.

If you’re deciding on which badge to earn, you can check out my article weighing the pros and cons of earning Emergency Preparedness vs Lifesaving, byclicking here.

Overall Difficulty: 5 and 6.
EPrep mainly consists of straightforward knowledge requirements but requires a scout to earn their First Aid merit badge beforehand. For Lifesaving, a scout must demonstrate various swimming and rescue techniques in the water. Be warned, Lifesaving is more difficult to earn than the Swimming merit badge!

Hardest Requirement For Emergency Preparedness: To complete requirement 1 of Emergency Preparedness, you’ll first need to earn the First Aid merit badge. Additionally, you’ll also need to take part in an emergency service project with your Scouting unit or a community agency to complete requirement 7.

Hardest Requirement For Lifesaving: Requirement 1 of the Lifesaving badge requires you to swim continuously for 400 yards while demonstrating various strokes. Outside of this, you’ll also need to show confidence in the water by completing various aquatic rescue exercises.

Citizenship in the Community

Overview:If you’ve reached the middle of your Scouting career, it’s about time you earn the Citizenship merit badges. Citizenship in the Community will help scouts to understand their government on a local level, as well as identify ways to support organizations benefiting their community.

Overall Difficulty: 8.
Often considered the most difficult citizenship merit badge to complete, Citizenship in the Community mainly requires scouts to complete projects, volunteer in their community, and understand various knowledge requirements. 

Hardest Requirement: To complete requirement 7, you’ll need to volunteer with an organization helping your community for a total of eight hours. You’ll also have to attend other local events and develop a presentation to showcase unique aspects of your community.

Citizenship in the Nation

Overview: The Citizenship in the Nation merit badge teaches scouts about the rights and responsibilities of US citizens. In completing this badge, scouts will also learn about the history and present-day function of the American government on a national level. 

Overall Difficulty: 6.
Citizenship in the Nation mainly requires you to learn and understand our government’s basic functions, and should not be too difficult to complete. However, you’ll also need to work on a few projects such as touring a national facility and writing a letter to an elected official.

I recommend scouts complete the Citizenship badges around the age of 15 as, at that point, they’ll have likely taken classes in school, such as world history and civics, that would give them a good background to earn these types of badges.

Hardest Requirement: Requirement 8 is probably the most difficult part of the Citizenship in the Nation merit badge, as it requires you to write a letter to one of your district’s elected officials. Later, you’ll also need to discuss any response you receive with your counselor.

Citizenship in the World

Overview: Citizenship in the World will teach scouts about the various organizations that help to uphold international law. Scouts will also learn about various cultures and global events, hopefully becoming more open-minded and accepting of all people in our world.

Overall Difficulty: 5.
Citizenship in the World is often considered the most straightforward Citizenship merit badge and will mainly test your ability to answer knowledge requirements. In fact, the entire badge can be researched and completed in one sitting if you’re dedicated enough. 

If you still haven’t earned Citizenship in the World and are looking to easily earn an Eagle-required badge, I’d highly recommend you check out my complete guide, here.

Hardest Requirement: To complete Citizenship in the World requirement 3, you’ll need to research a current world issue along with the various countries involved. This will take a decent understanding of geography and politics, which is why I recommend this badge for scouts who have already taken world history and geography classes.

Environmental Science or Sustainability

Overview: Both the Sustainability and Environmental Science merit badges will teach you important skills about how to conserve resources and protect the natural ecosystem. However, while Sustainability deals more with reducing waste in your household, Environmental Science will teach you about the science behind the way that humans interact with nature.

If you’re deciding on which badge to earn, check out my full comparison of the Environmental Science vs Sustainability merit badge byclicking here.

Overall Difficulty: 7 and 8.
Both Environmental Science and Sustainability are tricky badges that are usually worked on individually. For either choice, you’ll have a balanced mix of experiments and knowledge requirements to complete. Through your experiments, you’ll develop a thorough understanding of how your actions impact our environment!

Hardest Requirement For Environmental Science: Requirement 3 of the Environmental Science merit badge will give you the option to either conduct experiments or write reports. Requirement 4 will have you carry out an experiment by observing a plot of land. Both of these tasks are tricky and will take a minimum of one week to complete.

Hardest Requirement For Sustainability: Requirement 2 of the Sustainability merit badge will be tough. You’ll need to make various plans to implement sustainability into your household by reducing your food, water, and energy waste. At a minimum, this one requirement will take at least a month to carry out and complete.

Best Eagle-Required Merit Badges For Older Scouts (Over 15)

A quick note, I’ve saved these badges for older scouts because they’re typically done individually and deal with topics that are more complex and ‘adult’. You earn merit badges to learn life skills, so to get the most out of Scouting, I’d highly recommend you wait until you’re 15 before starting any of the following badges.

Family Life

Overview: The Family Life merit badge teaches scouts the importance of cooperation within a household, as well as some key skills necessary to one day start their own families. This badge is best suited for older scouts who face greater responsibilities in and outside of their households.

Overall Difficulty: 6.
While the requirements for Family Life aren’t too difficult, you’ll still need to be on top of things to successfully complete this badge. In addition to discussing various topics with your parents, you’re also be tracking your home duties, creating a project for your household, and hosting a family meeting.

Hardest Requirement: For most scouts earning the Family Life merit badge, requirement 3 will be the most difficult. Requirement 3 has you track and complete at least five regular chores over the course of at least 90 days. By staying on top of your schedule, you’ll develop organizational skills and ensure your plans succeed.

Personal Fitness

Overview: Personal Fitness is a time-consuming merit badge, but will be much easier if you participate in any school sports. In earning Personal Fitness, you’ll learn the proper way to care for your body, choose nutritious foods, and remain healthy. You’ll also create and follow a regular exercise plan.

Overall Difficulty: 7.
Since most of the personal fitness requirements are about you, this merit badge usually isn’t too difficult for most scouts to earn. The hardest part will be to create and follow a fitness routine for three months. However, if you’re taking a PE class, this requirement becomes much easier to complete.

Hardest Requirement: Requirements 7 and 8 ask you to outline a physical fitness program to follow over the span of 12 weeks. You’ll need to keep a regular log of your activities and results, showing improvement in various fitness categories.

Personal Management

Overview: The Personal Management merit badge will equip scouts with the skills to manage their finances as young adults. To earn this badge, you’ll need to track your budget for three months, as well as identify the answers to various knowledge requirements. Personal Management is one of the most useful merit badges and has many real-world applications.

Overall Difficulty: 9.
It’ll take effort and perseverance to complete the Personal Management merit badge. Requiring a thorough understanding of various financial terms, as well as the completion of a few projects, Personal Management is easily one of the most difficult Eagle-required merit badges.

Hardest Requirement: Requirement 2 asks you to create a budget and track your expenses for a period of 13 consecutive weeks. Outside of that, you’ll need to do hours of research to complete the financial knowledge requirements.

Luckily, I put a ton of work into creating a complete guide to the Personal Management merit badge for you! Check it out by clicking here.

Communication

Overview: The Communication merit badge will teach scouts to structure their thoughts and speak articulately. To complete this badge, scouts must investigate the communications styles of themselves and others, ultimately using these skills to host an event and present on behalf of their troop.

Overall Difficulty: 8.
Communication is often one of the last merit badges that Eagle Scouts earn, and for good reason. It’s tough! Between giving presentations, conducting interviews, and creating written content, Communication is likely one of the most difficult merit badges a scout can earn.

Hardest Requirement: Communication doesn’t have just one hard requirement — they’re all difficult and require hands-on effort. Requirements 2-8 will have you scripting and planning events, attending local meetings, and presenting on multiple occasions. Good luck!

Eagle-Required Merit Badge Difficulty Rank Recap Table

Starter-Tier Merit BadgesMedium-Tier Merit BadgesExpert-Tier Merit Badges
First AidEmergency Preparedness or LifesavingCommunication
CampingCitizenship in the Nation and WorldFamily Life
CookingCitizenship in the CommunityPersonal Fitness
Swimming, Hiking, or CyclingEnvironmental Science or SustainabilityPersonal Management

Conclusion

Do you have your next Eagle-required merit badges in mind now? You should! The difficulty ratings I’ve included come from the experiences I’ve on my journey to becoming an Eagle Scout, as well as from the input of other scouts online. Hopefully, now it’ll help you out too! 🙂

By the way, whether you’re just beginning your Scouting journey, or are well on your way to becoming an Eagle Scout, there are some very important things you should know to be prepared. Things like timelines, quick advancement strategies, and planning your Eagle Project.

Luckily, I’ve written you a complete guide on All of the Need-to-Know Info for Finishing Merit Badges and Earning Eagle! You should definitely check it out when you have the chance, as working without a plan is never a good idea.

Thanks for reading, and I hope to see you here at ScoutSmarts again soon. As always, I’m wishing you the best of luck on your Scouting journey!

Sours: https://scoutsmarts.com/eagle-merit-badge-difficulty-rankings/

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