Henry 565 vs 555

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Looking to renovate your floors, but worried about the state of your underlying floor and the costs that will be involved in leveling it out? Any experienced home DIY enthusiast should be able to level their own floors with self-leveling concrete.

Self-leveling concrete is a polymer-modified concrete that is highly viscous. You pour it over the floor like a thick liquid, and let it run into corners and across the floor to create a flat and even surface, with minimal effort.

It is ideal for flatten existing hard floors, such as concrete, tile, and plywood, before installing new interior flooring, such as LVP, tiles, or wood, in the home.

But just because self-leveling concrete is easier to use than the traditional stuff, doesn’t mean that things can’t go wrong. Mixing can be challenging, the window to pour correctly before setting is short, and the appropriateness of options for different environments are not easy to get right. There are lots of things that can go wrong with this home DIY project.

Read on to find out everything you need to know about self-leveling concrete and how to use it. Also, check out our list of reviews of the five best self-leveling concretes for home DIY projects.

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Advantages Of Self-Leveling Concrete

There are a variety of advantages to using self-leveling concrete rather than calling in a professional to level your floor using traditional concrete, and it is not just the money you could save. In fact, your professional builder may well use self-leveling concrete themselves to complete the task.

Advantages Of Self-Leveling Concrete
  1. Self-leveling doesn’t require the addition of water to be placed, which means less mess and fuss, and you are less likely to overwater your concrete.
  2. Self-leveling concrete creates a highly smooth surface that is also high-strength. While this makes it the ideal underlay for other floorings, the floor is also smooth and strong enough to stand alone as a flooring option.
  3. Self-leveling concrete can not only be used for leveling concrete, but can be laid on top of any non-flexible surface, such as ceramic tile, LVP, wood, or plywood.
  4. Self-leveling concrete is easy to use, so even amateurs can successfully level their concrete floors with the product.
  5. Self-leveling concrete results in a concrete stronger than normal concrete, which means it is ideal for reinforced concrete construction.
  6. Self-leveling concrete is very unlikely to cause allergic reactions. This is in contrast to regular concrete, which can cause a chromium allergy in workers, resulting in occupational asthma.
  7. Self-leveling concrete is also more resistant to mold growth in wet conditions than regular concrete.
  8. Self-leveling concrete dries extremely fast, which means less time to wait for your next steps (and fewer opportunities for anyone to put a footprint in your work).
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Disadvantages Of Self-Leveling Concrete

While there are a huge number of advantages to self-leveling concrete, every product has its drawbacks and things to be wary of when working with it:

  1. Self-leveling concrete dries very fast, which means that you need to work with it quickly. Depending on the product and the conditions, you can have a little as 20 minutes to mix, pour, and finish your surface.
  2. Self-leveling concrete does nothing to reinforce the underlayer on which it is laid. If anything goes wrong with the subfloor, the self-leveling concrete can loosen, which will also result in damage to anything that is laid on top of it.
  3. Self-leveling concrete can stick firmly to tools and any other surface that it is splashed against. All these items need to be cleaned immediately in order to ensure they are not permanently stained.

Different Types Of Self Leveling Concrete

There are two different types of self-leveling concrete: acrylic-based and water-based.

Acrylic Self-Leveling Compound

Acrylic self-leveling compound is made from mixing acrylic liquid polymer and cement powder. It results in a floor that is relatively elastic (for concrete) and is resistant to scratches and abrasions. It takes longer to dry than the other type of self-leveling concrete.

Water-Based Self-Leveling Compound

Water-based self-leveling compound uses water as its lubricant, resulting in a surface that has a consistency more in line with normal concrete. It dries very fast, and can dry in as little as 20 minutes. You usually buy this in powder form and mix in water to create the concrete.

5 Best Self Leveling Concrete Reviews

There are a wide range of self-leveling concretes available, which can be purchased from most home improvement stores. But let’s take a closer look at five of the best self-leveling concrete brands.

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Akona &#; Best Overall Floor Leveling Compound

Akona’s self-leveling compound is a water-based product you can mix yourself by just adding water, as primer has already been added to the mix. It is designed for interior application only and can be laid to a thickness of ⅛ of an inch to one inch.

Akona - Best Overall Floor Leveling Compound

Quick-drying, floor coverings can be laid on top of the created surface after just 24 hours. This product is particularly recommended if you are looking to encapsulate radiant heating installations. It can protect cables and tubes and even help heat be more evenly distributed.

You can expect this compound to set within 10 to 20 minutes of being laid. One pound bag, which costs around $35, should cover 50 square feet when poured at ⅛ inch thickness.

Sikafloor &#; Best Acrylic Concrete Floor Leveler

Sikafloor is an acrylic self-leveling compound that comes in both standard and Latex variations for an extra supple surface. It can be laid thinner than the other options on this list, spreading as thin as 1/25 inch, or as thick as 1 ½ inch.

This acrylic option has a longer initial set time or about two hours, but it will still be possible to walk on the floor after about four hours.

A pound bag will cover around 50 square feet at ⅛ inch thick and it costs around $ Primer should be applied to the floor separately before the mixture is poured.

Henry &#; Best Leveler For Thickness

Henry Floor Pro is another water-based compound that comes in powder form, and you just need to mix with water, pour, and spread. Fast-drying, you can start laying ceramic tile just six hours after installation and other floorings after 16 hours.

This product is ideal if you are dealing with deeper crevices in your floor, as it can be laid up to five inches thick. It can also be laid over concrete, ceramic tile, and wood.

Unlike with Akona, Henry does not come with a primer included, and a primer layer should be distributed prior to pouring. Henry recommends their own FloorPro Underlayment Primer.

A standard pound bag costs around $40 and should cover 44 square feet at ⅛ inch thickness. You can expect this compound to reach its initial set within about 30 minutes depending on conditions.

LevelQuick &#; Best Leveler For Final Surface

Another water-based compound. LevelQuick RS is another self-leveling concrete you can buy in powdered form and create your pouring compound by mixing in water.

Specifically designed to be applied in just one pour, it can be laid to a thickness of 1 ½ inches. Unlike most of the other compounds on this list, which are not recommended to the final floor surface, LevelQuick results in a floor that is appropriate for both home use and commercial use in locations such as flood plants, breweries, and kitchens.

You can expect LevelQuick to set within 20 minutes of being laid, and a standard pound bag will set you back around $ Floors should be separately prepared with a primer prior to pouring the cement.

Mapei &#; Best Value For Money Leveler

Mapei Self-Leveler Plus is one more water-based leveler on this list. It is highly affordable at just $30 for a pound bag, though, unlike with Akona, a separate primer is required.

Designed for indoor floors, this compound can be laid from ⅛ inch to 1 inch thick. The surface will be ready to receive ceramic tiles after 24 hours and other types of flooring after 48 hours.

A pound bag costs about $30 and will cover 48 square feet at ⅛ inch thickness. The initial set will usually happen within 10 to 15 minutes.

How To Install Self-Leveling Concrete

Self-leveling concrete is the kind of thing that you can pour yourself, as you don’t need a trained and professional eye to get your floor perfectly flat and even. The product will do that for you. But that doesn’t mean it isn’t complex. It requires preparation and having everything you need to plan, as the window of time for the concrete to reach its initial set is small.

How To Install Self-Leveling Concrete

Preparation

  • The first thing to do is to prepare your surface to ensure it is stable, solid, and clean. This involves clearing any debris and ensuring there are no joints or substantial cracks. The self-leveling concrete will cover these issues, but will do nothing to correct them.
  • To prevent the self-leveling contrate form moving to unwanted areas create 1&#; X 2&#; lumber damns with the edges wrapped in duct tape.
  • 24 hours before the product is used, acclimate the water and power to degrees Fahrenheit.
  • While some self-leveling concretes will include a primer, the majority do not, so floors will need to be primed. Consult your product instructions to see what primer is most appropriate for the product you are using and the type of floor you are installing on.
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Concrete Surfaces
  • Surface must be cured for at least 28 days minimum.
  • Remove and dirt, oil, grease, or other adhesives that could lessen adhesion.
  • Surface should be roughened to ensure proper adhesion. Techniques such as shotblasting or sanding can be used.
Plywood Surfaces
  • Ensure a clean surface free or dirt, oil, or paint.
  • Allow a 3mm gap between sheets
  • Fasten a metal or plastic lath every &#; before applying the self-leveling concrete.

Mixing

  • Make sure all storage containers, tools, and water are clean.
  • Use a 5 gallon pail, mix the self-leveling concrete with cool water for two minutes using a RPM drill.
  • Important: avoid adding more water or over mixing the product. If you see a white film begin to form, this means overwatering has occurred.

Application

  • Apply the self-leveling concrete to a floor temperature between degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Pour the material onto the floor in a uniform and even manner.
  • Use a trowel to push the compound into areas that are not being evenly covered.
  • If more concrete is needed over an existing pour, wait 24 hours.
  • The product will be fully set and hard after about 2 hours and can then accept foot traffic.
  • Wait 72 hours before installing flooring (refer to the product sheet for exact time)
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Curing

  • Curing compounds should be avoided.
  • Ensure the HVAC is turned off and the area is not exposed to direct sunlight.

Product Safety Precautions

Self-leveling concrete formulas have improved a lot in recent years, and they are now safer and easier to use than ever. But there are still some limitations that should be considered.

  • The most likely hazards form self-leveling concrete are burns from dust in the eye or skin irritation.
  • Protective gear should be worn (water resistance gloves and goggles) to prevent the concrete from coming into contact with the eyes. If eyes are exposed, they should be cleaned with water and medical attention sought.
  • Prolonged contact with the skin can also be detrimental, and exposed skin should be washed as soon as possible. Clothes should also be thoroughly cleaned before worn again.
  • Inhaling the product can also irritate the lungs. If you start coughing or sneezing, leave the vicinity of the concrete.
  • Temperatures can adversely affect how the concrete sets. It does best in temperatures between 65 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit (18 to 29 degrees Celsius).
  • Self-leveling concrete should only be used indoors.
  • Self-leveling concrete can fill gaps, but should not be used on surfaces with an incline of more than %, as this will undermine the way the substance disperses.
  • Store in a cool, dry place with no exposure to direct sunlight.
  • Use product within 1 year of purchasing
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FAQs

How Thick Can You Use Self-Leveling Concrete?

How thick you can pour self-leveling concrete depends on the specific product used. But standard thicknesses are between ⅛ inch and 1 inch. However, it is possible to get options that pour as thin as 1/25 inch and as thick as 5 inches.


How Much Does A 50 Lb. Bag Of Self Leveler Cover?

A 50lb. bag of standard self-leveling concrete should cover around 50 square feet at ⅛ inch thickness.


How Does Self-Leveling Concrete Work?

Self-leveling concrete is highly viscous, so it does not need to be spread with a trowel. Instead it can be poured into a space and will fill gaps like a viscous liquid, creating a smooth surface. The cement is designed to dry quickly after pouring and to set stronger than standard concrete.


Do I Need To Prime Concrete Floor Before Leveling?

Most self-leveling concrete manufacturers will advise you to prime concrete flooring before applying the leveler compound. Some brands will come with a primer included in the mix, so there may be no need to add an additional priming layer.


Can You Put A Second Coat Of Self-Leveling Concrete Down?

Yes, it is possible to lay a second layer of self-leveling concrete once the first layer is fully set and dry. Primer should be used before pouring just like with any concrete floor. It is best to wait 24 hours.

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The Verdict

Self-leveling concrete is a useful tool when it comes to fixing up uneven internal floors ready for new flooring to be laid down on top. It is easy to use, so most experienced home DIYers should be able to do the job, saving significant money.

The key to doing it right is to get your concrete to the right level of viscosity when mixing with water. It is this that allows the compound to spread evenly and create a flat and consistent surface.

The other thing to bear in mind when you start working is you need to work quickly. Once you stop mixing the mixture and start pouring, you can have as little as 10 minutes before the leveler compound reaches its initial set. Once it starts setting, it can be challenging to fix mistakes.

If you have any comments or first-hand experiences with self-leveling concrete, please post them below or share your pictures via our social media.

About Maricel Dee

Maricel Dee is a writer & blogger on all things home improvement. When she's not writing on her favorite home improvement topics, you can find her immersed in her own home projects.

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Paid $ to Not "Self Level" my floor with Henry "Self Leveling" Underlayment


So, room is ' x " . 4 40lb bags of Henry "Self Leveling" Underlayment (covers 23 sqft at 1/4 height per bag). Room has a 3/16 pitch from half way in and then levels out. Installed warm wire (1/8 thick) glued directly to hardibacker. Edges sealed (no leakage) and foam strips along wall edges. When finished I have pretty much the exact same pitch and warm wire (on low end of room) not covered. Time to call Henry support

4 bags Henry at 39 each = $
1 Bottle Henry primer at $15 = $15

Having Henry support tell me that "yes, that can happen" and "if you really want to level you can use screed pins and level it off that way" = Pricele$$.

I said that I assumed that the "Self Leveling" product I purchased would , ya know, "Self Level" They said "yes, I prefer they didnt call it that".

So, now I will be $ into a product if I want it to be the thickness I need and also will have to set up screed pins if I want a "level" floor.

What is wrong with this picture?

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Welcome to the forum, Bill.

Yep, self-leveling is a bit of a misnomer in this trade. Those products require a bit of help to get them where they need to go. It's not a matter of just mixing it up and pouring it out on the floor. Surface tension plays a big part, as you now know, so having a rake or similar tool handy is a must.

It also helps to have a helper do the mixing while you spread it.

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Hi Bill.

Sorry it didn't work out for you. Wish you woulda found us before the pour.

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Thanks all Just to be clear. The mix was not an issue. I just used 4 buckets and had 2 bodies mixing while I poured. We were well prepared with pre measured buckets of water and procedure went incredibly smooth (no pun intended). The whole operation took about 15 minutes. I used a notched squeegee since I have heat wire down and rake was not an option. I managed quite well and read directions and watched videos in prep for the pour. All looked great as far as the flow goes, except for the expected coverage, but I am totally blindsided by the fact that this "Self Leveling" product in fact does not "Self Level". I even went with the higher priced material (about $50 higher total) since I wanted the best result I could achieve. Now I have to lay more to get what I wanted to begin with and to be honest, it pains me a little to purchase another "Henry" product after discovering this "misnomer".

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I think you're also at the ragged edge of minimum slc thickness. You've got almost square feet so you'd get an average slc thickness of about 1/4". You also need to make up for a 3/16" change in elevation plus cover all of your wires so certain parts of the floor would have little or no slc coverage.

My admittedly limited experience is that you should try to get at least 3/8" slc thickness and preferably 1/2". This gives the material much better ability to flow and self level.

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Hmmm if my wires were at lower end, I expected it to flow that way which would have given me the 3/16 fill (completely covering the wires) and then some. The room is pretty level for about 5 feet or so and then slopes a little, as mentioned. The level area is where the tub and shower are to be installed (shower will be self built pan using Mark E products (3 x 4) so was not worried about much coverage there but knew I would have some (and I do. room was completely covered) so i expected the flow to give a nice fill where the heat wire sits. This was not the case. It appears as if it gave a nice even cover and followed the pitch leaving it just as it was.

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3/16 dip in the middle of a 10 foot long room? That doesn't sound bad to me at all. That's less than 1/16 per foot of slope. That much slope would be hardly noticeable no?

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I would be more concerned with FLAT than with level in this case. 3/16" isn't much out of level. Level is much harder to achieve than FLAT.

It should be called Self Flattening not self leveling though. Getting it level is much more difficult to achieve.

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"Flat" is good but I had "flat" before pouring the "Self Leveling Underlayment"

So the update is that WHenry has issued an RA for me and I was able to get a refund for the materials. I cannot recover the time spent and cannot pour another Self Leveling Underlayment since I do not have the height to do so. I cant rip up the old stuff because I have heat wire embedded (partially anyways) in it.

So, on to my next issue. I invest another hundred or 2 in Mark E Products only to receive their "Universal" center ring that is inches smaller than advertised. I purchased a California Faucets Styledrain (http://www.calfaucets.com/category/btyledrain-tile) which is 6 inches square so of course I purchase the oversized "Universal" Mark E center ring which is listed on Amazon as being 10 x x only to receive an item that is 6 1/4 OB. Well that aint gonna work. Seller then tells me that the drain does not go inside the ring when the videos show just that. Tells me all the specs say its 10 inches even though its only 6 or so.

What the hell is going on with quality control? Self leveling Underlayment that, as tech support says, does not "Self level", and 10 inch rings that are 6 inches when you get them. I have quite a bit invested in this drain so off to start another "Help Me Please" thread.

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Bill, if it's all part of the same project, you can continue on right here in this thread.

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Most people that have used SLC will attest to the fact that it does NOT self level. It takes some help to do that, and it works MUCH easier if it is thicker than just barely covering the highest point. Pancake batter doesn't flow and fill the panneither does SLC. THey are both about the same consistency. That brand is NOT unique, they are all about the same, so don't blame them. The stuff is not thin like water, and needs help to flow. The wires help to restrict that, so having it thick enough to fully cover them across the entire floor would have worked better.

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Jim,

Having it thick enough to cover the wires was my intention. Keeping in mind that the heat wires were on the side of the room that pitched down you would have to agree that the SLU would/should be at its thickest in that area. The room was a little under sqft (where only approximately sqft needed leveling) so 4 bags should have given near 1/4 coverage all around it it was a level room. What should have happened was the lowest part would have had easily 1/4 or more of coverage when in fact it barely covered the 1/8 wire at its deepest. Bags were mixed correctly. I had 2 people preparing the mixture while I poured. The whole process, from the moment i poured the 1st bucket, took maybe 8 minutes. I wore plastic cleats while I poured and spread using a squeegee on a broom stick and a rubber squeegee which was notched so that it acted like a rake. The pour went quite nicely actually. The perimeter of the room was calked and window self stick foam was also installed around the perimeter. There was zero leakage or loss of material. I worked the material around just as directed and shown in the videos.

The mix was prepared using 4 separate buckets, each having the pre measured amount of water already in them (5 qts of water was measured out separately for each of the 4 buckets) . The mix was correct, otherwise it would have been quite apparent during pour. I cannot think of a single thing I could have done differently that would have changed the results. When tech support tells me that if I wanted a "level" finish I should have set up "screed pins" to achieve it then there is a problem. When I said to them that I assumed their "Self Leveling Underlayment" would "self level" the response was "yeah, I prefer (or wish) they wouldnt call it that. Watch the video. Nowhere is there mention of any additional attention or devices to achieve a "level" finish when using their "Self Leveling Underlayment".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xp6jU8SKff4

I will make plenty of mistakes on my own and I will own up to all of them but this one is not on me other than maybe being naive enough to believe what i was being told and shown by the manufacturer.

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Bill.

We're here to help you with your project. What you're learning is that by simply following the instructions as you understand them is typically not going to get you pro level results. There are just too many variables on a typical jobsite to allow for written instructions to address all of them.

So, how can we help you moving forward?

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The deeper the pour, the less impact surface tension has on things. The wires also impact its ability to flow well. It is unfortunate that it is labeled self-levelingit does to a degree, much more so that say concrete mix, but by no means is it like water, and even that, on say a waxed surface, beads up. The more viscous the material, the more that happens.

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Ok, thanks to all for their input. Much appreciated. . Now, moving on. What material would be best to level out my shower floor area (33 x 46) prior to using 'Pre Pitch"? Can/should I use a deck mud (5 to 1 ratio) to level and then use it again for prepitch and quick pitch or should I use a SLU (and screed it level)?

For leveling purposes I want to keep the material as low as possible so as to not raise this area too high. Lets say under a half inch. I have around a 1/4 slope in the 45 inch direction (away from drain area of course). Ironically, this area was relatively level before using the above mentioned SLU but thats in the past now

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