Most awarded films

Most awarded films DEFAULT

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Sours: https://www.statista.com/statistics/1002740/movies-with-the-most-oscar-wins/

Three films have won 11 Oscars. The first to achieve the record was Ben-Hur (USA 1959) which won from 12 nominations on 4 April 1960, followed by Titanic (USA 1997) from 14 nominations on 23 March 1998 and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (NZ/USA 2003) which won all 11 of its nominations on 29 February 2004.

Ben-Hur won with: Best Picture; Best Director; Best Actor; Best Supporting Actor; Cinematography; Art Direction; Sound; Music Score; Film Editing; Special Effects; Costume and loosing out to Room at the Top for Screenplay based on material from another medium.

Titanic received awards for: Best Picture, Best Director, Cinematography, Art Direction, Costume, Visual Effects, Sound, Sound Effects Editing, Film Editing, Original Dramatic Score, Original Song and losing out on Best Actress, Supporting Actress and Makeup.

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King walked away with: Best Picture, Best Director, Art Direction, Costume Design, Visual Effects, Sound, Editing, Makeup, Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published, Original Score and Original Song

Sours: https://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/world-records/most-oscars-won-by-a-film
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Poll: Films With Most Oscars

A poll by ahmad-zia.

This poll contains the films that have won 7 or more Oscars. Which one of these films is your favorite ? Discuss Here

See results without voting »

Make Your Choice

  1. Vote!

     

    Ben-Hur (1959)

    11 Oscars

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  2. Vote!

     

    Titanic (1997)

    11 Oscars

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  3. Vote!

     

    The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)

    11 Oscars

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  4. Vote!

     

    West Side Story (1961)

    10 Oscars

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  5. Vote!

     

    Gigi (1958)

    9 Oscars

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  6. Vote!

     

    The Last Emperor (1987)

    9 Oscars

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  7. Vote!

     

    The English Patient (1996)

    9 Oscars

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  8. Vote!

     

    Gone with the Wind (1939)

    9 Oscars

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  9. Vote!

     

    From Here to Eternity (1953)

    8 Oscars

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  10. Vote!

     

    On the Waterfront (1954)

    8 Oscars

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  11. Vote!

     

    My Fair Lady (1964)

    8 Oscars

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  12. Vote!

     

    Cabaret (1972)

    8 Oscars

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  13. Vote!

     

    Amadeus (1984)

    8 Oscars

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  14. Vote!

     

    Slumdog Millionaire (2008)

    8 Oscars

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  15. Vote!

     

    Gandhi (1982)

    8 Oscars

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  16. Vote!

     

    The Sting (1973)

    7 Oscars

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  17. Vote!

     

    Shakespeare in Love (1998)

    7 Oscars

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  18. Vote!

     

    Schindler's List (1993)

    7 Oscars

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  19. Vote!

     

    Patton (1970)

    7 Oscars

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  20. Vote!

     

    Out of Africa (1985)

    7 Oscars

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  21. Vote!

     

    Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

    7 Oscars

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  22. Vote!

     

    Going My Way (1944)

    7 Oscars

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  23. Vote!

     

    Dances with Wolves (1990)

    7 Oscars

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  24. Vote!

     

    The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)

    7 Oscars

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  25. Vote!

     

    The Best Years of Our Lives (1946)

    7 Oscars

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  26. Vote!

     

    All About Eve (1950)

    7 Oscars

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  27. Vote!

     

    Gravity (2013)

    7 Oscars

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Sours: https://www.imdb.com/poll/BqRcLxboMIs/
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List of Academy Award records

Wikipedia list article

Walt Disney, the record-holder for most Academy Awards won (22 Oscars)

This list of Academy Award records is current as of the 93rd Academy Awards ceremony, held on April 25, 2021, which honored the best films of 2020 and early 2021.

Most awards[edit]

  • Most awards won by a single film: 11
    • Three films have won 11 Academy Awards:
  • Most nominations received by a single film: 14
    • Three films have received 14 nominations:
      • All About Eve (1950) – 16 categories available for nomination; won 6 awards
      • Titanic (1997) – 17 categories available for nomination; won 11 awards
      • La La Land (2016) – 17 categories available for nomination; won 6 awards
  • Largest sweep (winning awards in every nominated category): 11
    • The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003) won all 11 categories for which it was nominated: Best Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Art Direction, Makeup, Costume Design, Film Editing, Original Score, Original Song, Sound Mixing, and Visual Effects
  • Most awards won by a man: 22
  • Most awards won by a woman: 8
    • Edith Head won eight Oscars, all for Costume Design
  • Most nominations in a single year / Most awards in a single year: 6/4
    • In 1954, Walt Disney won four awards out of six nominations, both records. He won Best Documentary, Features for The Living Desert; Best Documentary, Short Subjects for The Alaskan Eskimo; Best Short Subject, Cartoons for Toot, Whistle, Plunk and Boom; and Best Short Subject, Two-reel for Bear Country. He had two additional nominations in Best Short Subject, Cartoons for Rugged Bear; and Best Short Subject, Two-reel for Ben and Me.
  • Most competitive awards won by a person who is still living: 8
    • Composer Alan Menken has won eight competitive awards
    • Visual Effects Supervisor Dennis Muren has won nine Academy Awards – six competitive awards, two "Special Achievement" awards, and one "Technical Achievement" award.
  • Acting: 4
  • Directing: 4
    • John Ford won the most directing awards, with four
  • Writing: 3
  • Film Editing: 3
  • Cinematography: 4
  • Film Music Composition and Songwriting: 9
  • Art Direction: 11
    • Cedric Gibbons, who designed the Oscar statuette, won 11 awards out of a total of 38 nominations
  • Costume Design: 8
    • Edith Head, won 8 awards out of a total of 35 nominations
  • Makeup: 7
    • Rick Baker, won 7 awards out of a total of 11 nominations
  • Visual Effects: 8
  • Special Effects (discontinued in 1962): 3
  • Most awards won for an animated feature film: 3
  • Most nominations received for an animated feature film: 4
  • Most awards won by a country for Best Foreign Language Film: 14
    • Italy won 14 awards in this category and received, in total, 31 nominations
  • Most nominations received by a country for Best Foreign Language Film: 40
    • France received 40 nominations and won the award 12 times
  • Most nominations received by a country for Best Foreign Language Film without an award: 10
  • Most awards won by a foreign-language film: 4
    • Three foreign-language films have won four Academy Awards:
      • Fanny and Alexander (1982) won Best Foreign Language Film, Best Art Direction, Best Cinematography, and Best Costume Design
      • Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) won Best Foreign Language Film, Best Art Direction, Best Cinematography, and Best Original Score
      • Parasite (2019) won Best International Feature Film, Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Original Screenplay
  • Most nominations received by a foreign-language film: 10
    • Two foreign language films have been nominated for ten Academy Awards:
      • Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000): Best Foreign Language Film (*), Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Art Direction (*), Best Cinematography (*), Best Costume Design, Best Film Editing, Best Original Score (*), and Best Original Song
      • Roma (2018): Best Foreign Language Film (*), Best Picture, Best Director (*), Best Original Screenplay, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actress, Best Art Direction, Best Cinematography (*), Best Sound Editing, and Best Sound Mixing

Awards for debut acting or directing performances on film[edit]

The following individuals won Academy Awards for their film debut acting performances:

  • Best Actor
  • Best Actress
  • Best Supporting Actor
  • Best Supporting Actress
    • Gale Sondergaard (Anthony Adverse, 1936)
    • Katina Paxinou (For Whom the Bell Tolls, 1943)
    • Mercedes McCambridge (All the King's Men, 1949)
    • Eva Marie Saint (On the Waterfront, 1954)
    • Jo Van Fleet (East of Eden, 1955)
    • Tatum O'Neal (Paper Moon, 1973)
    • Anna Paquin (The Piano, 1993)
    • Jennifer Hudson (Dreamgirls, 2006)
    • Lupita Nyong'o (12 Years a Slave, 2013)[1][2][3]
  • Honorary Award
  • Academy Juvenile Award

The following individuals won Academy Awards for their film debut direction.

Big Five winners[edit]

Main article: List of Big Five Academy Award winners and nominees

Three films have received the Big Five Academy Awards: Best Picture, Director, Actor, Actress, and Screenplay (Original or Adapted; however, all of the movies listed below won the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay).[6][7][8]

Most consecutive awards[edit]

  • Any awards
    • Walt Disney was awarded a record of 10 awards in the eight consecutive years from 1931/32 through 1939. Eight (listed below) are for Short Subject (Cartoon), and two were Special Awards: one for the creation of Mickey Mouse, and one recognizing the innovation of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
  • Best Picture
  • Best Director
  • Best Actor
  • Best Actress
  • Best Supporting Actor
  • Best Supporting Actress
    • No consecutive winner for Best Supporting Actress
  • Best Adapted Screenplay
  • Best Original Screenplay
    • No consecutive winner for Best Original Screenplay
  • Best Art Direction
  • Best Cinematography
  • Best Costume Design
  • Best Film Editing
  • Best Original Score
  • Best Original Song
  • Best Sound Mixing
  • Best Visual Effects
  • Best Documentary (Feature)
  • Best Short Subject (Cartoon)
    • Of Walt Disney's many awards for Best Animated Short, eight of these wins were in consecutive years, for Flowers and Trees in 1931/32, Three Little Pigs in 1932/33, The Tortoise and the Hare in 1934, Three Orphan Kittens in 1935, The Country Cousin in 1936, The Old Mill in 1937, Ferdinand the Bull in 1938, and The Ugly Duckling in 1939
  • Best Short Subject (Two-Reel)

Academy Award firsts[edit]

  • First person born in the 20th century to win and be nominated for an Academy Award
  • First person born in the 21st century to be nominated for an Academy Award
  • First Asian person (and non-Caucasian person) to win Best Picture
  • First Asian person (and non-Caucasian person) to be nominated Best Picture
  • First Asian director (and non-Caucasian director) to win Best Director
  • First Asian person (and non-Caucasian) to be nominated for Best Director
  • First Asian person (and non-Caucasian person) to receive each of the Honorary Awards
  • First Black person to win Best Picture
  • First Black person to be nominated for Best Picture
  • First Black director to be nominated for Best Director
  • First woman to win and be nominated for Best Picture
  • First woman to win Best Director
  • First woman of color to win and be nominated for Best Director
  • First woman to be nominated for Best Director
  • First woman to win Best Animated Feature
  • First woman to be nominated for Best Animated Feature
  • First woman to win Best Original Score
  • First woman to receive each of the Honorary Awards
    • 6-year old Shirley Temple received an Academy Juvenile Award in 1934
    • Greta Garbo received an Honorary Award in 1954
    • Martha Raye received a Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1969
    • Kay Rose received a Special Achievement Academy Award for Sound Effects Editing of The River in 1985
    • Kathleen Kennedy received an Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 2018
  • First fantasy film to win Best Picture
  • First fantasy film to be nominated for Best Picture
  • First foreign-language film to win Best Picture
  • First foreign-language film to be nominated for Best Picture
  • First horror film to win Best Picture
  • First horror film to be nominated for Best Picture
  • First science-fiction film to win Best Picture
  • First science fiction film to be nominated for Best Picture
  • First X-rated film to win and be nominated for Best Picture
  • First film with an entirely non-white cast to win Best Picture[14]
  • First film with an all-black cast to win Best Picture
  • First 3-D film to be nominated for Best Picture
  • First animated film to be nominated for Best Picture
  • First highest-grossing film of all time to win and be nominated for Best Picture
  • First highest-grossing film of all time to not be nominated for Best Picture
  • First highest-grossing film of all time to not win an Academy Award
  • First film to receive the most nominations of its year without receiving a Best Picture nomination
  • First adult animated films to be nominated in any categories
    • The Triplets of Belleville (2003) is rated PG-13 by the MPAA, the first PG-13 rated to be nominated for Best Animated Feature and Original Song.
    • Isle of Dogs (2018) is rated PG-13 by the MPAA, the first PG-13 rated to be nominated for Best Original Score.
    • South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut (1999) is rated R by the MPAA, the first R-rated to be nominated for Best Original Song.
    • Waltz with Bashir (2008) is rated R by the MPAA, the first to be nominated for Best Foreign Language Film, representing Israel.
    • Anomalisa (2015) is rated R by the MPAA, the first R-rated to be nominated for Best Animated Feature.
  • First animated film to be nominated for any Screenplay award, specifically Best Original Screenplay
  • First animated film to win Best Animated Feature and nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay
  • First animated film to win both music categories
    • Pinocchio (1940) for Best Original Score and Song.
  • First animated film to win technical category, specifically Best Sound Editing until was merged into Best Sound at 93rd Academy Awards
  • First animated film to be nominated for technical category, even Best Visual Effects
  • First non-computer animated films to win Best Animated Feature
  • First actor or actress to receive ten nominations for acting
  • First actor to receive ten nominations for acting
  • First actor or actress to receive twenty nominations for acting
  • First person to be nominated for acting and songwriting in the same year
  • First posthumous win for acting
  • First posthumous nomination for acting
  • First posthumous nomination for an actor
  • First posthumous nomination for a black actor
  • First actor or actress to win and be nominated for performing in a sign language
  • First actor or actress to win for performing in a language other than English
  • First actor or actress to be nominated for performing in a language other than English
  • First actor to win for performing in a language other than English
  • First actor to be nominated for performing in a language other than English
  • First actor or actress to be nominated for a performance in a 3-D film
  • First actor to be nominated for a performance in a 3-D film
  • First African to win for acting
  • First African to be nominated for acting
  • First Asian to win for acting
  • First Nordic to win for acting
  • First Nordic to be nominated for acting
  • First Nordic actor to be nominated for acting
  • First Southeast European to be nominated for acting
  • First Australian to win Best Actor
  • First Australian to win Best Actress
  • First Canadian to win Best Actress
  • First Canadian actor to win in an acting category
  • First French to win Best Actor
  • First French to win Best Actress
  • First French to win for performing in the French language
  • First French to be nominated for performing in the French language
  • First Italian to win Best Actor
  • First Italian to win Best Actress
  • First German to win Best Actor
  • First German to win Best Actress
  • First Latin American to win Best Actor
  • First Latin American actress to win in any category
  • First South Korean to win in an acting category
  • First Spanish actor to win in an acting category
  • First Spanish actress to win in an acting category
  • First actor of Russian descent to win in an acting category
  • First actress of Russian descent to win in an acting category
  • First Canadian director to win Best Director
  • First persons from India to win in any music category
  • First Middle Eastern/North African to be nominated for acting
  • First Middle Eastern movie to win Best Foreign Language Film
  • First foreign actress to be nominated twice for Best Actress for foreign-language films without the films receiving a Best Foreign Language Film nomination
  • First black actress to win in an acting category
  • First black actor to win in an acting category
  • First black actress to win Best Actress
  • First black actress to win for film acting debut
  • First year in which two black actors/actresses won for acting
  • First black African actor to be nominated for acting
  • First actress to win in any acting category and as a producer of the Best Picture in the same night
  • First black writer to win for screenwriting
  • First African American to receive an Honorary Award
  • First Latin American to win Best Director
  • First South American to be nominated for Best Actress
  • First Muslim actor to win in an acting category
  • First child actor to receive an Academy Award nomination[15]
  • First short film to win an Academy Award outside of the Short Film categories
  • First professional athlete to win an Academy Award
  • First deaf actor to win in an acting category
  • First actor with dwarfism to win in an acting category
  • First actor with dwarfism to be nominated in an acting category
  • First actor to win for a portrayal of a character of the opposite gender
  • First portrayals of living persons to win in each acting category
  • First hip hop song to win Best Original Song
  • First woman of Filipino descent to win in any award

Age-related records[edit]

  • Youngest winner of an acting award
  • Youngest nominee for an acting award
  • Youngest Best Actress winner
  • Youngest Best Actress nominee
  • Youngest Best Actor winner
  • Youngest Best Actor nominee
  • Youngest winner of an Oscar
    • Shirley Temple, age 6, who was awarded the inaugural (now retired) non-competitive Academy Juvenile Award in 1934
  • Youngest winner of an award for Best Original Screenplay
  • Youngest Best Director winner
  • Youngest Best Director nominee
  • Oldest Best Director winner
  • Oldest Best Director nominee
  • Oldest winner of an acting award
  • Oldest Best Actress winner
  • Oldest Best Actor winner/nominee
  • Oldest nominee for an acting award
  • Oldest nominee for a lead acting award
  • Oldest competitive Oscar winner
  • Oldest competitive Oscar nominee
  • Earliest-born Oscar winner by birth year
  • Earliest-born Oscar nominee by birth year
  • Year where all four Acting winners had the oldest age average
  • Year where all four Acting winners had the youngest age average
  • Youngest multiple nominees for an acting award (Best Actor or Best Supporting Actor)
NominationNameAgeFilmYearDate of birthDate of nomination
2nd Sal Mineo22 years, 17 days Exodus1960January 10, 1939January 27, 1961
3rd Marlon Brando29 years, 318 days Julius Caesar1953April 3, 1924February 15, 1954
4th Marlon Brando 30 years, 315 days On the Waterfront1954April 3, 1924February 12, 1955
5th Marlon Brando 33 years, 321 days Sayonara1957April 3, 1924February 18, 1958
6th Richard Burton44 years, 98 days Anne of the Thousand Days1969November 10, 1925February 16, 1970
7th Jack Nicholson46 years, 300 days Terms of Endearment1983April 22, 1937February 16, 1984
8th Jack Nicholson 48 years, 289 days Prizzi's Honor1985April 22, 1937February 5, 1986
9th Jack Nicholson 50 years, 301 days Ironweed1987April 22, 1937February 17, 1988
10th Jack Nicholson 55 years, 302 days A Few Good Men1992April 22, 1937February 18, 1993
  • Youngest multiple nominees for an acting award (Best Actress or Best Supporting Actress)
NominationNameAgeFilmYearDate of birthDate of nomination
2nd Angela Lansbury20 years, 103 days The Picture of Dorian Gray1945October 16, 1925January 27, 1946
3rd Jennifer Lawrence23 years, 154 days American Hustle2013August 15, 1990January 16, 2014
4th Jennifer Lawrence 25 years, 152 days Joy2015August 15, 1990January 14, 2016
5th Kate Winslet31 years, 110 days Little Children2006October 5, 1975January 23, 2007
6th Kate Winslet 33 years, 109 days The Reader2008October 5, 1975January 22, 2009
7th Bette Davis36 years, 304 days Mr. Skeffington1944April 5, 1908February 3, 1945
8th Meryl Streep39 years, 238 days A Cry in the Dark1988June 22, 1949February 15, 1989
9th Meryl Streep 41 years, 236 days Postcards from the Edge1990June 22, 1949February 13, 1991
10th Meryl Streep 46 years, 236 days The Bridges of Madison County1995June 22, 1949February 13, 1996

Film records[edit]

  • Most nominations for a single film
  • Most Oscars without winning Best Picture
  • Most nominations without winning Best Picture
  • Most nominations without any wins
  • Most nominations without a Best Picture nomination
  • Most Oscars without a nomination for Best Picture
  • Fewest nominations for a Best Picture winner
    • Grand Hotel (1932) received only the Best Picture nomination.
  • Nominations in the most different technical categories
    • Titanic (1997) was nominated in all 10 technical categories (Cinematography, Costume Design, Film Editing, Production Design/Art Direction, Score, Song, Sound Editing, Sound Mixing, Visual Effects, and Makeup).
  • Most nominations without a major nomination (Picture, Director, Acting and Screenplay)
  • Best Picture nominees that won every nomination except Best Picture
    • These 15 films were nominated for Best Picture and won in every category they were nominated for, except Best Picture:
      • Bad Girl (1931), 2/3
      • The Private Life of Henry VIII (1932), 1/2
      • Naughty Marietta (1935), 1/2
      • The Story of Louis Pasteur (1936), 3/4
      • The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), 3/4
      • Miracle on 34th Street (1947), 3/4
      • The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948), 3/4
      • A Letter to Three Wives (1949), 2/3
      • King Solomon's Mines (1950), 2/3
      • Three Coins in the Fountain (1954), 2/3
      • Jaws (1975), 3/4
      • Traffic (2000), 4/5
      • The Blind Side (2009), 1/2
      • Selma (2014), 1/2
      • Bohemian Rhapsody (2018), 4/5
  • Films nominated for Best Picture with no other major nominations
    • These 28 films were nominated for Best Picture but had no other major nominations (this does not include films that were only nominated for Best Picture and nothing else):
      • Wings(1927), 2 nominations (winner)
      • 42nd Street(1933), 2 nominations
      • A Farewell to Arms(1933), 4 nominations
      • Cleopatra(1934), 5 nominations
      • Flirtation Walk(1934), 2 nominations
      • The Gay Divorcee(1934), 5 nominations
      • Imitation of Life(1934), 3 nominations
      • The White Parade(1934), 2 nominations
      • David Copperfield (1935), 3 nominations
      • Les Misérables(1935), 4 nominations
      • A Midsummer Night's Dream(1935), 4 nominations (note: actually had 2, but 2 more were write-in nominations)
      • Naughty Marietta(1935), 2 nominations
      • Top Hat(1935), 4 nominations
      • A Tale of Two Cities(1936), 2 nominations
      • The Adventures of Robin Hood(1938), 4 nominations
      • Of Mice and Men(1939), 4 nominations
      • The Wizard of Oz(1939), 6 nominations
      • King Solomon's Mines(1950), 3 nominations
      • Decision Before Dawn(1951), 2 nominations
      • Three Coins in the Fountain(1954), 3 nominations
      • The Music Man(1962), 6 nominations
      • Doctor Dolittle(1967), 9 nominations
      • Hello, Dolly!(1969), 7 nominations
      • Jaws(1975), 4 nominations
      • Beauty and the Beast(1991), 6 nominations
      • The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers(2002), 6 nominations
      • War Horse(2011), 6 nominations
      • Selma (2014), 2 nominations
      • Black Panther (2018), 7 nominations
      • Ford v Ferrari (2019), 4 nominations
  • Stories made into multiple Best Picture nominees
    • 8 sets of Best Picture nominees share either original source material or were revised versions of the same story (* =winner):
      • Cleopatra (1934), Cleopatra (1963)
      • Mutiny on the Bounty (1935)*, Mutiny on the Bounty (1962)
      • Romeo and Juliet (1936), West Side Story (1961)*, Romeo and Juliet (1968). (The plot of another Best Picture winner, Shakespeare in Love, revolves around the original production of Romeo and Juliet)
      • Les Misérables (1935), Les Misérables (2012)
      • Pygmalion (1938), My Fair Lady (1964)*
      • Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941), Heaven Can Wait (1978)
      • A Star Is Born (1937), A Star Is Born (2018)
      • Little Women (1933), Little Women (2019)
  • First Best Picture produced wholly by non-Americans
  • First Best Picture produced wholly by non-Americans or non-British
  • First Best Picture produced wholly by non-Caucasians
  • Most wins by a film produced wholly or partially by non-Americans
  • Most nominations for a film produced wholly or partially by non-Americans
  • Best Picture with no female speaking roles
  • Best Picture winners adapted from Best Play/Musical Tony Award Winners
  • Best Picture winners based on Pulitzer Prize winning sources
  • Best Picture winners with the highest prize wins from the "Big Three" (Cannes, Venice, and Berlin)
  • Acting nominations from a single film

Acting records[edit]

  • Most awards for leading actress
  • Most awards for leading actor
  • Most awards for supporting actor
  • Most awards for supporting actress
  • Most consecutive leading actress nominations
  • Most consecutive leading actor nominations
  • Actor with most total nominations for acting
  • Actress with most total nominations for acting
  • Most nominations for an actor without a win
    • Peter O'Toole with 8 nominations (He received an Honorary Award in 2002)
  • Most nominations for an actress without a win
  • Most nominations for an actor performing in a foreign language
  • Longest gap between first and second award
  • Longest time span between first and last nomination and between first and last award
  • Most acting nominations before first award
  • Most posthumous nominations
  • Shortest performance to win an acting Oscar
  • Shortest performance to win a lead acting Oscar
  • Shortest performance to be nominated for an acting Oscar
  • Shortest male performance to be nominated for a lead acting Oscar
  • Shortest female performance to be nominated for a lead acting Oscar
  • Longest performance to win an acting Oscar
  • Longest performance to win a supporting acting Oscar
  • Longest performance to be nominated for an acting Oscar
  • Longest male performance to be nominated for a supporting acting Oscar
  • Longest female performance to be nominated for a supporting acting Oscar
  • Most awards by an African American actor
  • Most awards for one acting performance
    • Harold Russell played Homer Parish in The Best Years of Our Lives in 1946. For this role he received 2 Oscars, one for Best Supporting Actor and an honorary award for being an inspiration to all returning veterans.
  • Most nominations for one acting performance
  • Years where all four Acting winners were born outside the United States
  • Acting winners who won a Tony Award for portraying the same character

Miscellaneous records[edit]

  • Most nominations in different decades
    • John Williams:
      • 1960s: 1968
      • 1970s: 1970 (2 nominations), 1972, 1973 (2 nominations), 1974 (3 nominations), 1975, 1976, 1978 (2 nominations), 1979
      • 1980s: 1981, 1982, 1983 (2 nominations), 1984, 1985 (2 nominations), 1988 (2 nominations), 1989
      • 1990s: 1990 (2 nominations), 1991 (2 nominations), 1992 (2 nominations), 1994, 1996 (3 nominations), 1997, 1998, 1999
      • 2000s: 2000, 2001, 2002 (2 nominations), 2003, 2005, 2006 (2 nominations)
      • 2010s: 2012 (2 nominations), 2013, 2014, 2016, 2018
      • 2020s: 2020
  • Only people to win both a Nobel Prize and an Oscar
  • People who won both a Pulitzer Prize and an Oscar
    • Aaron Copland: Won an Oscar for Best Original Score for the film The Heiress in 1949, and the Pulitzer Prize for Music in 1945.
    • John Corigliano: Won an Oscar for Best Original Score for the film The Red Violin in 1999, and the Pulitzer Prize for Music in 2001.
    • Bob Dylan: Won an Oscar for Best Original Song for the song "Things Have Changed" from Wonder Boys in 2000, and an additional citation in the Pulitzer Prize for Music in 2006.
    • Horton Foote: Won two Oscars; Best Adapted Screenplay for the film To Kill a Mockingbird in 1962, and Best Original Screenplay for the film Tender Mercies in 1983, and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1995.
    • Marvin Hamlisch: Won three Oscars in 1973; Best Score-Adaptation or Treatment for the film The Sting, and Best Original Score and Best Original Song for the title song of the film The Way We Were, and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1976.
    • Oscar Hammerstein II: Won two Oscars; Best Original Song for the songs "The Last Time I Saw Paris" from the film Lady Be Good in 1941, and "It Might as Well Be Spring" for the film from the film State Fair in 1945, and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1950, along with an additional citation in 1943.
    • Sidney Howard: Posthumously won an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay for the film Gone With the Wind in 1939, and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1925
    • William Inge: Won an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay for the film Splendor in the Grass in 1961, and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1953.
    • Frank Loesser: Won an Oscar for Best Original Song for the song "Baby, It's Cold Outside" from the film Neptune's Daughter in 1949, and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1962
    • Richard Rodgers: Won an Oscar for Best Original Song for the song "It Might as Well Be Spring" from the film State Fair in 1945, and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1950, along with an additional citation in 1943.
    • William Saroyan: Won an Oscar for Best Story, Screenplay for the film The Human Comedy in 1943, and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1940.
    • John Patrick Shanley: Won an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay for the film Moonstruck in 1987, and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2005.
    • Robert E. Sherwood: Won an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay for the film The Best Years of Our Lives in 1946, and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1936, 1938, and 1941, and the Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography in 1949.
    • Stephen Sondheim: Won an Oscar for Best Original Song for the song "Sooner or Later (I Always Get My Man)" from the film Dick Tracy in 1990, and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1985.
    • Alfred Uhry: Won an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay for the film Driving Miss Daisy in 1989, and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for the stage version in 1988.
  • Only person to win both an Olympic medal and an Oscar
  • Only person to win for Acting and Songwriting
  • Only person to win for Acting and Writing
  • Only person nominated for Acting, Writing, Producing, and Directing for the same film
  • Only actor to win an Oscar for portraying a real Oscar winner
  • Only actor to win an Oscar for portraying a fictional Oscar nominee
  • Only actor to appear in two movies with 11 Oscar wins
  • Most total nominations without a win
  • Most total nominations before receiving an award
    • Film composer Victor Young was nominated 21 times without winning. He was often nominated multiple times in one year; twice, four times at the same Oscars. He won posthumously for Around the World in 80 Days, alongside yet another nomination (also posthumous).
      • Sound re-recording mixer Kevin O'Connell comes in at a close second, with 20 unsuccessful nominations from 1983 until 2016, when he finally won for Hacksaw Ridge.
  • Most nominations for a person
  • Most nominations for a living person
  • Only write-in nominee to win a competitive award
  • Most nominations in distinct categories
  • Most nominated woman
  • Highest "perfect score"
    • Sound editor Mark Berger has four nominations and four wins
  • Most nominations for directing
  • Most nominations for directing without an award
  • Most wins for producing
  • Most nominations for producing
  • Most nominations for directing in a single year
  • Most Best Picture awards for a film series
  • Most nominations and awards for a film series
  • Most nominations for Best Original Screenplay
  • Longest time between the release of a film and winning an Oscar
    • Limelight (1952) is the only film to have won an award twenty years after its official release. Since it was not released in Los Angeles County until 1972, it was not eligible for any Academy Awards until that time.
  • Most posthumous award wins
  • Most posthumous award nominations
  • Highest-grossing film to win Best Picture
  • Highest-grossing film to be nominated for Best Picture
  • Lowest-grossing film to win Best Picture
  • Longest film to win Best Picture
  • Longest film to win an award
    • O.J.: Made in America (2016), 467 minutes (Best Documentary)
    • The longest fictional film to win an award was War and Peace (1968), 431 minutes (Best Foreign Language Film)
  • Shortest film to win Best Picture
  • Shortest film to win an award
  • Most acting awards for a character
  • Most nominations for a character
    • Three portrayals of Queen Elizabeth I of England earned nominations for:
    • Three portrayals of King Henry VIII of England earned nominations for:
    • The lead characters of three different versions of A Star Is Born have been nominated:
    • 24 other characters have been nominated twice – (*) = winning portrayal:
      • Abraham Lincoln – Raymond Massey, Daniel Day-Lewis (*)
      • Arthur Chipping – Robert Donat (*), Peter O'Toole
      • Billie Holiday – Diana Ross, Andra Day
      • Cyrano de Bergerac – Jose Ferrer (*), Gerard Depardieu
      • "Fast Eddie" Felson – Paul Newman (*); Newman played Felson in The Hustler and its sequel, The Color of Money, winning for the sequel.
      • Father Chuck O'Malley – Bing Crosby (*); Crosby played O’Malley in Going My Way and The Bells of St. Mary's, winning for Going My Way.
      • Father Fitzgibbons – Barry Fitzgerald (*) – nominated for Best Actor and won for Best Supporting Actor, for the same performance in Going My Way
      • Henry Higgins – Leslie Howard, Rex Harrison (*)
      • Howard Hughes – Jason Robards, Leonardo DiCaprio
      • Iris Murdoch – Judi Dench, Kate Winslet – portrayals of the same character at different ages in the same film (Iris)
      • Jo March – Winona Ryder, Saoirse Ronan
      • Joe Pendleton – Robert Montgomery, Warren Beatty
      • The Joker – Heath Ledger (*), Joaquin Phoenix (*)
      • King Henry II of England – Peter O'Toole
      • King Henry V of England – Laurence Olivier, Kenneth Branagh
      • Leslie Crosbie – Jeanne Eagels, Bette Davis
      • Max Corkle – James Gleason, Jack Warden
      • Michael Corleone – Al Pacino
      • Richard Nixon – Anthony Hopkins, Frank Langella
      • Rocky Balboa – Sylvester Stallone
      • Rooster Cogburn – John Wayne (*), Jeff Bridges
      • Rose DeWitt Bukater – Kate Winslet, Gloria Stuart – portrayals of the same character at different ages in the same film (Titanic)
      • Vincent van Gogh – Kirk Douglas, Willem Dafoe
      • Vito Corleone – Marlon Brando (*), Robert De Niro (*)
  • Most royalty and leaders portrayed
    • 47 portrayals of monarchs or civil leaders (real and fictional), have been nominated for acting awards, with 11 winners.
    • The United Kingdom is the most represented nation.
    • Portrayals of four French kings and EmperorNapoleon have received nominations.
    • The only portrayal of a non-British monarch to win an award was Yul Brynner as King Mongkut of Siam in The King and I.
    • 11 portrayals of presidents of the United States – three of them fictional – have been nominated, with Daniel Day-Lewis's portrayal of Abraham Lincoln in Lincoln the only winner.
    • Two portrayals of popes (the head of state for Vatican City) have been nominated, both from the film The Two Popes.
    • 11 portrayals of spouses/consorts of leaders have been nominated, with Katharine Hepburn's Eleanor of Aquitaine in The Lion in Winter the only winner.
    • Three portrayals of dictators have been nominated:
  • Most Honorary Awards
  • Tallest Oscar winner/nominee
  • Shortest Oscar winner
  • Shortest Oscar nominee

Oscar speeches[edit]

Main article: Oscar speech

  • Longest speech
    • The longest Oscar speech was that given by Greer Garson at the 15th Academy Awards after she was named Best Actress for 1942 for Mrs. Miniver. Her speech ran for nearly six minutes.[23] It was shortly after this incident that the Academy set forty-five seconds as the allotted time for an acceptance speech and began to cut the winners off after this time limit. When presenting the Best Actor award at the 24th Academy Awards, Garson quipped, "I think I have ten minutes left over from a highly emotional speech I made a few years ago. I'd be glad to give it to them."
  • Shortest speech
    • The shortest Oscar speech was that given by Patty Duke at the 35th Academy Awards after she was named Best Supporting Actress for 1962 for The Miracle Worker. Duke, age 16, was the youngest person at that time to receive an Academy Award in a competitive category. Her acceptance speech was, simply, two words – "Thank you" – after which she walked off the stage.[24] (Note: When Fred Zinnemann accepted the Best Picture Oscar for A Man For All Seasons, he simply nodded and smiled. However, minutes earlier he had won Best Director and made his thank-yous then, and thus felt he had nothing to add.)

Tied winners[edit]

There have been six two-way ties:

Clean sweep[edit]

The following films with at least two nominations won all of their nominations.

  • 1927/1928: Wings (2)
  • 1934: It Happened One Night (5)
  • 1940: Pinocchio (2)
  • 1947: Black Narcissus (2)
  • 1958: Gigi (9)
  • 1966: Born Free (2)
  • 1966: Grand Prix (3)
  • 1971: Sentinels of Silence (2)
    • Best Documentary Short Subject: Robert Amram and Manuel Arango
    • Best Live Action Short Subject: Robert Amram and Manuel Arango
  • 1974: The Great Gatsby (2)
  • 1985: Cocoon (2)
  • 1987: The Last Emperor (9)
  • 1993: Jurassic Park (3)
  • 1994: Ed Wood (2)
  • 1995: Pocahontas (2)
  • 1995: Restoration (2)
  • 1995: The Usual Suspects (2)
  • 1999: The Matrix (4)
  • 2003: The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (11)
  • 2006: An Inconvenient Truth (2)
  • 2007: The Bourne Ultimatum (3)
  • 2011: The Iron Lady (2)
  • 2013: Frozen (2)
  • 2013: The Great Gatsby (2)
  • 2017: Coco (2)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Academy_Award_records

Films most awarded

Which film has won the most Oscars ever? The Academy Award winners list

It’s been a long time coming, but film fans can finally look forward to enjoying this year’s delayed Academy Awards, which are taking place this Sunday (25th April).

Last year’s ceremony saw a major first, with Parasite becoming the first foreign-language film to ever win the top prize, and there’s the potential for a few more groundbreaking wins this time around.

Chloe Zhao is in with a very good shout of becoming the first woman of colour to win the Best Director gong for her hugely acclaimed film Nomadland, while Riz Ahmed has an outside chance of becoming the first Muslim actor to take home a Best Actor Oscar.

The Oscars are almost 100 years old, having first been held in 1929, and since then there have been a whole heap of victories celebrating the entertainment industry’s very best on-screen and behind-the-scenes talent.

But who has the prestigious claim of owning the most Academy Awards? Which actors, directors and screenwriters have collected the largest number of Oscars statuettes – and which film holds the record for the most awards to its name?

Here’s everything you need to know.

Which film has won the most Oscars of all time?

Three films hold the record of winning the most Academy Awards, having garnered 11 Oscars each: Ben-Hur (1959), Titanic (1997) and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003).

Out of these, Titanic received the most nods with a total of 14 nominations.

Who has won the most Oscars of all time?

The person who has triumphed more times at the Oscars than anyone else in history is Walt Disney.

America’s most iconic filmmaker racked up a whopping 26 Oscars, four of which were honorary awards, and he also holds the record for the most nominations on record – 59.

Who has won the most Oscars for acting?

Actress Katharine Hepburn holds the record for the most Oscars for acting, having won four Academy Awards across her career and earned a total of 12 nominations.

Hepburn won Oscars in the best actress category for her performances in the films Morning Glory (1933), Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967), The Lion in Winter (1968) and On Golden Pond (1981).

Actors Jack Nicholson, Daniel Day-Lewis and Walter Brennan, meanwhile, are the three men with the most Oscars for acting, having each won three times. While some of Brennan and Nicholson’s awards were for best supporting actor, all three of Day-Lewis’s victories were for best leading actor, and he holds the record in that category.

The person with the most nominations for acting is Meryl Streep, who has received 21 nods over the course of her career. She has won three times for Kramer vs. Kramer (1979), Sophie’s Choice (1982) and The Iron Lady (2011).

Who has won the most Oscars for directing?

John Ford won none of his four Oscars for his famous Westerns. Instead, he holds the Best Director record for The Informer (1935), The Grapes of Wrath (1940), How Green Was My Valley (1941) and The Quiet Man (1952).

Although Ford has won the most Oscars of any director, William Wyler holds the record for the most nominations in this discipline earning 12, three of which won him some silverware. Ford was nominated for five overall, boasting an enviable conversion rate.

Who has won the most Oscars for screenwriting?

Five people have been awarded three screenwriting Oscars: Billy Wilder, Charles Brackett, Francis Ford Coppola, Woody Allen, and Paddy Chayefsky.

But it is Allen who has won the most Academy Awards in the Best Original Screenplay category, for his films Annie Hall (1977), Hannah and Her Sisters (1986), and Midnight in Paris (2011).

Which British person has won the most Oscars?

Film composer John Barry has won more Oscars than any other Brit. He has garnered five Academy Awards in total, two for Born Free (1966), and one each for Lion in Winter (1968), Out of Africa (1985) and Dances with Wolves (1990).

Which British actor has won the most Oscars? 

That would be Daniel Day Lewis with his three wins for My Left Foot, There Will Be Blood and Lincoln.

The 2021 Academy Awards will be held on Sunday 25th April and will be broadcast on Sky Cinema in the UK. You can access it with a NOW Sky Cinema Pass.

Looking for something to watch tonight? Take a look at our TV Guide.

Sours: https://www.radiotimes.com/movies/who-has-won-the-most-oscars/
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