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Ford Falcon (XA)

For a complete overview of all Falcon models, see Ford Falcon (Australia).

Motor vehicle

The Ford Falcon (XA) is a full-size car that was produced by Ford Australia from 1972 to 1973. It was the first iteration of the third generation of this Australian-made model and also included the Ford Fairmont (XA)—the luxury-oriented version of the Falcon.The XA falcon GS was also released in full GTHO exterior trim. Having the flutes in both, bonnet and front guards. It also had all the GT blackouts, not the typical GS stripe. Also has tags with 302 code but actually have 351 crank and so forth. They are very rare, not many are known to have been made

Overview[edit]

Sold between March 1972 and September 1973, the XA series was the first Falcon to be designed (with assistance from Ford's US headquarters) and manufactured in Australia.[3] It featured an entirely new body which was larger and more roomy than that of its XY series predecessor, giving it the "coke-bottle" look.[3] The XA range also had a longer list of options, although the choice of engines carried over from the previous XY Falcon range. All V8 302 CID and most 351 CID "Cleveland" engines were now Aussie made. GT Falcons could have Aussie or imported 351 CID V8s fitted.[4] Wagons, utilities and panel vans now featured a longer wheelbase than the sedan. Fairmont wagons had a dual-action tailgate that could be opened either downwards or sideways, optional on base model Falcon and Falcon 500 Wagons.[4]

The addition of a two-door hardtop to the range marked the first time that this body style had been offered on an Australian Falcon since the XP series of 1965–1966.[5] The hardtop's longer doors with frameless windows were shared with the utility and van, with a different shape glass to suit the commercial vehicles' body apertures.[5] The shorter doors of the sedan and wagon with their framed windows were also available with optional quarter vent windows, though these were very rare, mainly fitted to cars in the hotter parts of Australia. This option was available in the subsequent XB and XC models, though very scarce.

The XA Falcon range were the first Falcons fitted with in-dash vents for face level flow-thru ventilation, although they only worked while the car was in motion.

A total of 129,473 XAs were built.[3] While successful, the XA Falcon range proved to be short-lived as it gained a significant frontal appearance update to become the XB series in September 1973.

Model range[edit]

Sedans and Wagons were introduced in March 1972, the Hardtops in August 1972 [3] and the Utilities and Vans in October of that year.[6]

  • Falcon Sedan
  • Falcon Wagon
  • Falcon 500 Sedan
  • Falcon 500 Wagon
  • Falcon 500 Hardtop
  • Futura Sedan
  • Fairmont Sedan
  • Fairmont Wagon
  • Fairmont Hardtop
  • Falcon GT Sedan
  • Falcon GT Hardtop
  • Falcon Utility
  • Falcon Van
  • Falcon 500 Utility
  • Ford XA Falcon 500 Hardtop (with non-standard wheels)

  • Ford XA Falcon GT Hardtop

  • Ford XA Falcon 500 Utility with Grand Sport Rally Pack and additional driving lights

Grand Sport Rally Pack[edit]

A Grand Sport Rally Pack was offered on Falcon, Falcon 500 and Fairmont models.[7] The XA GS had rally stripes that ran from the front indicators to the end of the rear doors. It also shared many options as used on the GT Falcon, such as the 12 slot steel wheels with plain brushed centre caps, the three spoke wooden rimmed steering wheel with rim squeeze horn and full GT dash instrumentation featuring tachometer, odometer, oil pressure, water temperature and voltmeter as standard. For the first time the GS model range was also available as a two-door hardtop and was also offered as an option on utes and panel vans. A 260 hp (190 kW) two barrel version of the 5.8 L (351 cu in) Cleveland V8 was also available as an option on the GS sedans only. The GS could also be fitted with the Option 56 ‘driving lights’ grille which was standard on the GT, however, the GT bonnet with NACA style ducts was not available as an option on the XA GS.[8]

Falcon GTHO Phase IV[edit]

Ford XA Falcon GT-HO Phase IV

As the previous XW and XY series Falcon GT sedans, an extra-high-performance limited-production version of the XA Falcon GT sedan, the GT-HO Phase IV, was developed by Ford Australia for homologation in Group E Series Production Touring Car racing, targeting in particular the 1972 Hardie-Ferodo 500 at Bathurst. Production of the required 200 examples was abandoned in July 1972 following intense media and political pressure, and only one production example was completed.[9][10] This significant road car was manufactured in Calypso Green metallic with a white vinyl interior, and has recently been completely restored.

Additionally, three regular production Falcon GT sedans - especially painted in Brambles Red - had been in the process of being developed for racing to GT-HO specification by Ford Special Vehicles Division and were to be raced at Bathurst in 1972 by factory drivers Allan Moffat and Fred Gibson. With the abandonment of the XA Falcon GT-HO as a production car, development was immediately halted on the three race cars and they were sold off. However, one of these cars did go on to serve a life in motorsport, specifically as a rally car campaigned by Bruce Hodgson. It was later destroyed in a road accident. Although the three cars featured standard Falcon GT compliance plates, they are considered by most Ford fans to be race-prepared versions of the XA Falcon GT-HO Phase IV.

Howard Marsden, head of Lot 6, designated the race cars as follows XA-1 Allan Moffat (Carthew); XA-2 Gibson (Bowden); XA-3 (Hodgson).

Falcon GT - RPO 83[edit]

Between April 1973 and August 1973, Ford Australia built 250 XA Falcon GTs fitted with the RPO 83 package, 130 of these being sedans and 120 being hardtops.[11] RPO 83 comprised three variations from the standard XA Falcon GT, these being of a Holley 780 carburettor, 2.25 inch exhaust headers and a clutch slave cylinder hydraulic pipe heat shield.[11] Pricing and external appearance did not vary from the standard models.[11] The 2.25 inch exhaust headers were subsequently homologated for the XA Falcon GT for Group C Touring Car racing, including the 1973 Hardie-Ferodo 1000.[11]

Falcon 500 Superbird - RPO 77[edit]

Ford XA Falcon 500 Superbird Hardtop. Pictured in Polar White/Cosmic Blue with correct colour-coded wheel centres

Following the positive public reaction given to its XA Falcon GT Hardtop-based “Superbird” show car at the 1973 Melbourne Motor Show, Ford Australia released a limited production “Superbird” to the public.[12] The production Superbird was an XA Falcon 500 Hardtop fitted with an option package designated as RPO 77.[12] The package included the Australian-built 302 cubic inch Cleveland V8 engine, sports suspension, Grand Sport Rally Pack instrumentation and a rear window louvre. Three contrasting paints schemes matched with colour-coded wheel centres were offered,[12] the choices being Polar White with Cosmic Blue accent, Yellow Fire with Walnut Glow accent and Lime Glaze with Jewel Green accent.[13] Large "Superbird" decals adorned the rear quarter panels and the rear-mounted "Falcon 500" badging was retained.[12] The advertised production run was 750 units,[14] however the actual production total is thought to have been lower.[12] The entire production run was completed in the months of March through May 1973.[12]

Motor Sport[edit]

Allan Moffat and Ian Geoghegan won the 1973 Hardie-Ferodo 1000 at Bathurst in a factory entered XA Falcon GT Hardtop and John Goss and Kevin Bartlett won the 1974 Hardie-Ferodo 1000 in a privately entered example.

References[edit]

  1. ^Advertisement for Ford Ranchero, www.flickr.com Retrieved on 12 October 2013
  2. ^"John J. Telnack". Automotive Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on 24 June 2016. Retrieved 30 April 2017.
  3. ^ abcdPedr Davis, Aussie Cars, 1987, page 129
  4. ^ abFord Falcon XA Retrieved from www.uniquecarsandparts.com.au on 25 April 2010
  5. ^ abNorm Darwin, The History of Ford in Australia, 1986, page 167
  6. ^A Bushby, The Australian Ford Falcon Collection, 1989, page 138
  7. ^Brochures: Ford Falcon XA Retrieved from www.uniquecarsandparts.com.au on 25 April 2010
  8. ^"Grand Sports (XA)". Aus-Ford-UK.co.uk. Australian Ford Register UK website. Retrieved 24 May 2015.
  9. ^Stewart Wilson, Ford Falcon, Mustang, Sierra, 1993, pages 36-38
  10. ^Australian Muscle Car, Issue 20, page 41
  11. ^ abcdMark Oastler, RPO 83 - Ford's secret Falcon GT, Australian Muscle Car, Issue 20, July/Aug 2005, pages 40-79
  12. ^ abcdefJoe Kenwright, 1973 Ford XA Falcon 500 Superbird Hardtop, Australian Muscle Car, Issue 51, Sept/Oct 2010, pages 88 to 97
  13. ^Sales brochure for Ford Falcon 302 V8 Superbird Hardtop, Ford Sales Company of Australia Limited
  14. ^Ford advertisement for 302 V8 Superbird Falcon Hardtop, Daily Telegraph, Friday May 4, 1973, page 9

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Falcon_(XA)

1972 Ford Falcon GT

Auction Sales History

1972 Ford Falcon GT

1973 Ford Falcon XA 351 Coupe – sold for $43,700. Ford’s XA was the first Australian designed Falcon and broke with the traditional styling of the previous XW/XY model, ushering in a new era of curves and for the first time, a two-door hardtop coupe. Showing a strong American influence, the hardtop was Ford’s belated answer to the runaway success of the Holden Monaro. Launched in March 1972, the XA was sold in various guises including the 302-cid and 351-cid V8s. The interior was modernised, with wraparound fascia, and front disc brakes became standard across the range, along with safety items like rear seat belts. The hardtop was sold as the Falcon 500 or Fairmont with the option of a GS pack, or in high performance GT guise plus the limited Superbird edition with special decals. Ford’s XA/XB/XC hardtops rate as one of the toughest Aussie muscle cars ever made and today have an almost cult following, thanks in no small part to the Interceptor used in the “Mad Max” movies.

Another Ford example with celluloid history, this 351-cid XA Coupe enjoyed a starring role in the 1999 movie “Two Hands” as Sydney crime boss Bryan Brown’s personal car and was also driven on screen by a young Heath Ledger. Thereafter it was kept by the movie’s director and writer Gregor Jordan until 2004 before passing to the current owner, Sydney comedian and radio personality Merrick Watts with a passion for Australiana. Featuring the desirable 351-cid V8 under the bonnet, the XA has automatic transmission and comes with some recent service records. The car has covered very little mileage in recent years, with routine maintenance carried out. Sold registered in NSW with the numberplates ‘2HANDS’, these are not transferrable if sold interstate. Auction Source: 2011 Motorclassica

Sours: https://www.supercars.net/blog/1972-ford-falcon-gt/
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Ford Falcon (XB)

For a complete overview of all Falcon models, see Ford Falcon (Australia).

Motor vehicle

The Ford Falcon (XB) is a full-size car that was produced by Ford Australia from 1973 to 1976. It was the second iteration of the third generation of this Australian-made model and also included the Ford Fairmont (XB), the luxury-oriented version of the Falcon.

Overview[edit]

The XB series bore minor cosmetic differences to the preceding model, the XA, aimed at giving the car a more muscular stance. First time equipment offerings included standard front disc brakes on all models[1] and an available carpeted interior.

Model range[edit]

The XB Falcon range included the following models:

  • Falcon Sedan
  • Falcon Wagon
  • Falcon Utility
  • Falcon Van
  • Falcon 500 Sedan
  • Falcon 500 Hardtop
  • Falcon 500 Wagon
  • Falcon 500 Utility
  • Falcon 500 Van
  • Futura Sedan
  • Fairmont Sedan
  • Fairmont Hardtop
  • Fairmont Wagon
  • Falcon GT Sedan
  • Falcon GT Hardtop

A Grand Sport Rally Pack option, which included bonnet scoops, striping, GS insignia and "GT" instrumentation, was available on Falcon 500, Futura and Fairmont models.[2][3]

  • Falcon 500 (XB) Utility with GS Rally Pack

  • Falcon 500 (XB) Van with GS Rally Pack

  • Fairmont (XB) sedan with GS Rally Pack

  • Fairmont (XB) Hardtop with GS Rally Pack

  • Fairmont (XB) wagon with GS Rally Pack

  • Ford Falcon GT (XB) sedan

Sovereign Edition[edit]

In July 1974, a special Falcon Sovereign Edition was released to celebrate Ford Australia's 50th anniversary. It was based on a Falcon 500 fitted, as standard, with a vinyl roof, Fairmont wheel covers, carpet, transistor radio and three thin body stripes. No records were kept on these cars so exact specifications and build quantities are unknown. Production of the Sovereign is believed to have ended in July 1975.

John Goss Special[edit]

Main article: John Goss Special

Among the limited edition variants of the XB was the John Goss Special, released in 1975 and named for the race driver who took a Falcon to victory in the 1974 Hardie-Ferodo 1000 Touring Car race at Bathurst. These specials were based on the Falcon 500 Hardtop, with decals and other bolt on options, such as the GT Bonnet. They were available in White with a choice of two accent colors: Emerald Fire and Apollo Blue.[4]

McLeod Ford "horn" cars[edit]

Max McLeod owned a Ford dealership in Rockdale, New South Wales, a suburb of Sydney, and sponsored John Goss entered Falcons in the South Pacific Touring Series, ATCC and multiple Bathurst 1000 races. In addition to further modifications to Fords own John Goss Special, McLeod offered the "horn" pack to various Falcon models. These cars are known for their stand-out "strobe" stripes that were applied to the cars, these stripes were the same as used in the McLeod sponsored John Goss racing cars.

  • Falcon Sovereign Edition (XB) sedan

  • Falcon (XB) Hardtop "John Goss Special"

  • Falcon GT (XB) Hardtop McLeod Ford "Horn car"

Production[edit]

Production of the XB series totalled 211,971 vehicles.[5]

Motorsport[edit]

Allan Moffat won the 1974 Sandown 250 driving an XB Falcon GT Hardtop. He also won the 1976 Australian Touring Car Championship driving an XB Falcon GT Hardtop and drove both an XB Falcon GT Hardtop and an XC Falcon GS Hardtop to win the 1977 Australian Touring Car Championship.

In film[edit]

In the 1979 film Mad Max, the title character's black "Pursuit Special" was a 351 cu in (5.8 L) version of a 1973 Ford XB GT Falcon Hardtop. Two 1974 XB sedans were also used as Main Force Patrol Interceptor vehicles. More Falcons were used to depict the Pursuit Special in sequels Mad Max 2 (1981) and Mad Max: Fury Road (2015).

A Falcon GT (XB) Hardtop is the subject of Eric Bana's 2009 documentary film Love the Beast. The film documents the 25-year history of Bana's Falcon, which he purchased at the age of 15.[6]

  • Replica of the Mad Max "Pursuit Special"

  • 1973 Ford XB Falcon Mad Max Tribute

  • 1973 Ford XB Falcon Mad Max rear view

  • Mad Max Main Force Patrol "Interceptor"

  • Main Force Patrol "Interceptor"

References[edit]

  1. ^Norm Darwin, The History of Ford in Australia, 1986, page 169
  2. ^Ford XB Falcon Sedan sales brochure, Ford Sales Company of Australia, 10/73, page 15
  3. ^AC Bushby, The Australian Ford Falcon Collection, 1989, page 161
  4. ^"Aussie Coupes - Mad Max Interceptor - Ford XB Falcon - Australian Ford falcon". aussiecoupes.com.
  5. ^Tony David, Aussie Cars, 1987, page 136
  6. ^1974 Ford Falcon [XB] in Love The Beast, Documentary, 2009 at the Internet Movie Car Database.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Falcon_(XB)
EL FALCON QUE DESAFIÓ A LA FERRARI. (Los dos videos)

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