Hex tube stock

Hex tube stock DEFAULT

Hexagonal bars are created by passing aluminum ingots through a heated forge and pressing them into the desired shape. Hex bars are so common as to be ubiquitous. Common uses for hex bars include fasteners for machinery, gears, machine parts, structural components, automobile parts, and drive shafts.

Aluminum is a popular choice for bar products because of its high strength-to-weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and low cost compared to other materials such as stainless steel. Certain aluminum alloys, such as the 2xxx series, have the highest tensile strength of any aluminum alloy, while other alloys are more resistant to corrosion or to high and low temperatures.

2024 aluminum is among the strongest aluminum alloys available today, and the high strength has earned it a reputation as the preferred aluminum alloy for the aerospace industry. It has good fatigue resistance, tensile strength, and shear strength. The corrosion resistance of the material is also good, making it suited for marine applications. However, the material can be easily damaged by high temperatures, and it is generally not suitable for welding. Common uses of 2024 hex bars include airplane structural components, gears and shafts, wheels, computer parts, and fasteners.

6061 aluminum is one of the most widely-used aluminum alloys on the market. 6061 has a good strength-to-weight ratio, high corrosion resistance, good machinability, and the metal responds favorably to welding. Additionally, 6061 can be anodized with great ease, giving it a pleasing finish. The material can also be cold-worked so that it stamped, bent, or drilled. Common uses include electrical connectors, marine components, fasteners, drive shafts, machine parts, and structural components.

Sours: https://www.clintonaluminum.com/product-category/aluminum/hex-bar/

hexagon tube/solid hex bar/4140 round bar/4130 tube/cold drawn seamless steel pipe

CF Steel bar/1045 round bar/4130 hex bar

kinds of special pipe 
1.OD:6-1200mm WT:1-60mm 
2.grade:Alloy steel,4130,4140 
3.Tolerance :- 0.01+0.01 
4. Precision steel tu 
 

 

pto shaft lemon tubeoctagonal steel tube/ triangle steel tube aisi 4140 steel pipe /ellipse tube

1.OD:6-1200mm WT:1-60mm 
2.grade:1020,1025,4130,4140 
3.Other types available 
Features:
1) Outer diameter: 15 - 80mm
2) Tube wall thickness: 1 - 8mm
3) Outer diameter: ± 0.01 mm 
4) Inside diameter: ± 0.01mm

 Delivery status: NBK(+N) BK(+C)  BKW+(LC) BKS(SR)

Seamless carbon and Alloy Steel Mechanical Tubing

Application

For mechanical and pressure use,and also for transporting steam,water,gas and etc.

Type

astm a519 4130 seamless steel pipe

cold drawn seamless mechanical tube a519 / rock drill steel rod 

astm a519 cold drawn tube hexagonal steel tube

alloy tube

sae 4140 cold drawn steel bar/hex tube

Cold drawn Bar_.jpgCold drawn Bar_32.jpg

SAE 1045 Hex bar/cold drawn round bar/hexagion bar

Cold drawn Bar_76.jpg

Shape

oval tube/ lancing pipe/octagon tubes / cone shaped tube/alloy tube etc.

.JPG

 

2.JPG

 

Piping Grade and Chemical Composition (%) 4140 

Grade

C

Mn

P≤

S≤

Si

Cr

Mo

1008

≤0.10

0.30-0.50 

0.040

0.050

-

-

-

1010

0.08-0.13

0.30-0.60

0.040

0.050

-

-

-

1018

0.15-0.20

0.60-0.90

0.040

0.050

-

-

-

1020

0.18-0.23

0.30-0.60

0.040

0.050

-

-

-

1025

0.22-0.28

0.30-0.60

0.040

0.050

-

-

-

1026

0.22-0.28

0.60-0.90

0.040

0.050

-

-

-

4130

0.28-0.33

0.40-0.60

0.040

0.050

0.15-0.35

0.80-1.10

0.15-0.25

4140

0.38-0.43

0.75-1.00

0.040

0.050

0.15-0.35

0.80-1.10

0.15-0.25

 

Mechanical Properties of cold drawn steel bar

Grade

Condition

MPa Tenslle Point

Yield Point

Elongation

1020

CW

≥414 

≥483

≥5%

 

SR

≥345

≥448

≥10%

 

A

≥193

≥331

≥30%

 

N

≥234

≥379

≥22%

1025

CW

≥448

≥517

≥5%

 

SR

≥379

≥483

≥8%

 

A

≥207

≥365

≥25%

 

N

≥248

≥379

≥22%

4130

SR

≥586

≥724

≥10%

 

A

≥379

≥517

≥30%

 

N

≥414

≥621

≥20%

4140

SR

≥689

≥855

≥10%

 

A

≥414

≥552

≥25%

 

N

≥621

≥855

≥20%

 

 

 

4140 / 4130 Seamless Mechanical Tubing are medium carbon alloy grades, which are widely used for many general purpose applications that require high tensile strength and toughness. The addition of chromium and molybdenum as alloying elements, combined with heat treatment, provides the combined advantage of hardness, ductility, and strength.

 

4140 tube Meets ASTM A519

4130 tube Meets ASTM A513 Type 5(DOM) A519 (CDS)

Stocked Size Range: 0.250” – 15” OD; 0.035” – 2.00” wall thickness

Stocked Lengths 8’-24’

Cut to Length available

 

 

Benefits of Round 4140/4130 Alloy Seamless Mechanical Tubing

Superior tensile strength and toughness

High strength to weight ratio kennametal

Easily heat treatable to a broad range of strength, machinability, and hardness.

Applications: aircraft components, hydraulic cylinders, rollers, structural apps, truck and automotive parts. ken

 

nametal tool SAE 4140 Steel Tube and cold drawn 4140 round bar for mechanical

kennametalc

 cold drawn 4140 round bar/ cold drawn steel bar

 Cold drawn Bar_3.jpg

 

Steel round bar Shot blasting machine

 

hexagon tube/solid hex bar/4140 round bar/4130 tube/cold drawn seamless steel pipe

Round steel bar/cold drawn steel tube straightness machine

 

hexagon tube/solid hex bar/4140 round bar/4130 tube/cold drawn seamless steel pipe

 

hexagon tube/solid hex bar/4140 round bar/4130 tube/cold drawn seamless steel pipe

 

 Working shop for cold drawn steel bar/hex bar.

 

hexagon tube/solid hex bar/4140 round bar/4130 tube/cold drawn seamless steel pipe

Finished 1045 hex bar/4130 hex bar/4140 round bar

 

hexagon tube/solid hex bar/4140 round bar/4130 tube/cold drawn seamless steel pipe

For more details please feel free to contact us. !

Sours: http://www.polypipefactory.com/sale-8068920-hexagon-tube-solid-hex-bar-4140-round-bar-4130-tube-cold-drawn-seamless-steel-pipe.html
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Bar stock

Storage area containing assorted bar stock.

Bar stock, also (colloquially) known as blank, slug or billet,[1] is a common form of raw purified metal, used by industry to manufacture metal parts and products. Bar stock is available in a variety of extrusion shapes and lengths. The most common shapes are round (circular cross-section), rectangular, square and hexagonal or hex. A bar is characterised by an "enclosed invariant convex cross-section", meaning that pipes, angle stock and objects with varying diameter are not considered bar stock.

Bar stock is commonly processed by a sequence of sawing, turning, milling, drilling and grinding to produce a final product, often vastly different from the original stock. In some cases, the process is partially automated by specialized equipment which feeds the stock into the appropriate processing machine.

Process and types[edit]

Most metal produced by a steel mill or aluminium plant is formed (via rolling or extrusion) into long continuous strips of various size and shape. These strips are cut at regular intervals and allowed to cool, each segment becoming a piece of bar stock. A good analogy is pasta-making, in which lumps of dough are extruded into various cross-sectional shapes; cut into lengths; and then dried in that form. The cross-sectional shapes of pasta vary from simple bar or tube shapes (such as linguine or penne) to more elaborate extrusions (such as rotelle, fiori, or rotini). The same is true of metal bar stock. The most common shapes are round bar (also called rod), rectangular bar (including square bar, the special case of equal sides), and hexagonal bar (usually called hex bar for short). Tube and pipe are similar, but have hollow centers and are traditionally not called "bar" in industrial usage. (However, a product called hollow bar, essentially tube but with custom-orderable OD and ID and thus custom wall thickness, is marketed for lathe bar work which can benefit from obviation of drilling and rough boring.) Also similar in concept, but not called "bar", are the common structural shapes such as angle stock and channel stock. These are commonly available in steel and aluminum; the names "angle iron" and "channel iron" are still commonly used (informally) even though their literal namesake, wrought iron, has been replaced by steel and aluminum for most uses.

In a machine shop, bar stock and plate are often called billet, although in a rolling mill, that word refers to a piece of metal that has not yet been rolled into bar.

A machine shop typically has a storage area containing a large variety of bar stock. To create a metal component, a bar of sufficient volume is selected from storage and brought to the machining area. This piece may then be sawed, milled, drilled, turned, or ground to remove material and create the final shape. In turning, for large-diameter work (typically more than 100 millimetres (3.9 in), although there is no universal threshold), a piece of the bar is cut off using a horizontal bandsaw to create a blank for each part. The blanks are then fed into a chucking lathe (chucker) which chucks each one in turn. For smaller-diameter work, the entire length of bar stock is more often fed through the spindle of the lathe. The entire bar rotates with the spindle during the part-machining cycle. When the cycle ends and one part is done, the chuck opens, the bar is pulled or pushed forward ("fed") by any of various automatic means, the chuck closes, and the next cycle begins. The last step of the cycle is to cut off the machined part from the bar, which is called "parting it off" and is achieved with a "cutoff" or "part-off" tool, a tool bit that grooves the bar all the way down to the centreline, causing the part to fall off. Then the cycle repeats.

The not-yet-cut bar protruding from the back of the spindle, rotating quickly, can present a safety hazard if it is sticking out too far and unconstrained from bending. Thus sometimes long bars must be sawn into shorter bars before being fed as "bar work" (which is the term for such work).

CNC lathes and screw machines have accessories called "bar feeders", which hold, guide, and feed the bar as commanded by the CNC control. More advanced machines may have a "bar loader" which holds multiple bars and feeds them one at a time into the bar feeder. Bar loaders are like magazines for part blanks (or pallets for milling work) in that they allow lights-out machining. The bar loader is filled with bars (or the magazine or pallet with part blanks) during working hours, and then it runs during the night unattended. Given that there is no human around to detect if something went wrong and the machine should stop, there are various kinds of sensors that are used to detect this, such as load meters, infrared beams, and, in recent years, webcams, which are placed inside the machine tool's enclosure and allow remote viewing of the cutting action.

Uses of bar stock[edit]

Bar stock is widely used in many industries and can be seen in many different industrial processes. These processes include forging, extrusion, machining, and many more. In forging, billets are heated to high temperatures before a press pushes the workpiece into the shape on the die. These presses operate at very high forces to make the desired changes to the product. Extrusion uses rollers that push the heated bar stock through a set of dies which will determine the shape of the workpiece. Machining is a subtractive process that utilizes bar stock and various cutters and tools to make intricate details that are not possible through other processes. [2]

Standard sizes throughout a supply chain[edit]

To stock every possible size of bar stock (every possible fraction of a millimetre or inch in diameter or thickness) is impossible. Thus, bar stock is stocked by metals supply houses in various standard sizes, arrayed in discrete steps. For example, round bar with diameters of even millimetres (or in the US, on the eighths of an inch) can usually be ordered from standing stock. Bar diameters of nonstandard sizes can also be obtained, but only as a separate mill run from the rolling mill. Thus they are much more expensive than the standard sizes, can take much longer delivery time, and are not desirable as inventory for the supply house or the machine shop (because the chance of selling or using any particular custom size is slim).

Sometimes it is necessary that the bar not be very much larger than the intended part, because the metallurgical properties of some metal alloys in some finishing processes may vary by how far inside the bar the metal lies. Thus an engineering drawing will specify a certain size (or a maximum size) that the bar may start out as. These specs face the aforementioned limitation of stocking sizes versus custom mill runs; standard sizes are used wherever possible to avoid wasted expense and needless delays.

Drill rod[edit]

A drill rod is tool steel round stock ground to a tight tolerance diameter; it is usually ± 0.0005 in (0.0127 mm). In the UK the name "silver steel" is often synonymous and sometimes hyponymous. Its origin was in reference to the shiny ground appearance (not to any silver alloying content). Drill rod diameters range from 0.0135 to 1.5 in (0.34 to 38.10 mm); in the United States diameters smaller than 27⁄64th of an inch (11 mm) are made in letter drill sizes and number drill sizes, in addition to fractional sizes. Lengths are usually one or three feet (0.3048 or 0.9144 m). It is commonly used to make drill bits, taps, reamers, punches, dowel pins, and shafts.[3] Note that the numbered sizes are different from the drill numbered sizes starting at 52. These sizes are:[citation needed]

gauge in mm
52 0.0630 1.6002
51 0.0660 1.6764
50 0.0690 1.7526
49 0.0720 1.8288
48 0.0750 1.9050
47 0.0770 1.9558
46 0.0790 2.0066
45 0.0810 2.0574
44 0.0850 2.1590
43 0.0880 2.2352
42 0.0920 2.3368
41 0.0950 2.4130
40 0.0970 2.4638
gauge in mm
39 0.0990 2.5146
38 0.1010 2.5654
37 0.1030 2.6162
36 0.1060 2.6924
35 0.1080 2.7432
34 0.1100 2.7940
33 0.1120 2.8448
32 0.1150 2.9210
31 0.1200 3.0480
30 0.1270 3.2258
29 0.1340 3.4036
28 0.1390 3.5306
27 0.1430 3.6322
gauge in mm
26 0.1460 3.7084
25 0.1480 3.7592
24 0.1510 3.8354
23 0.1530 3.8862
22 0.1550 3.9370
21 0.1570 3.9878
20 0.1610 4.0894
19 0.1640 4.1656
18 0.1680 4.2672
17 0.1720 4.3688
16 0.1750 4.4450
15 0.1780 4.5212
14 0.1800 4.5720
gauge in mm
13 0.1820 4.6228
12 0.1850 4.6990
11 0.1880 4.7752
10 0.1910 4.8514
9 0.1940 4.9276
8 0.1970 5.0038
7 0.1990 5.0546
6 0.2010 5.1054
5 0.2040 5.1816
4 0.2070 5.2578
3 0.2120 5.3848
2 0.2190 5.5626
1 0.2270 5.7658

Drill blanks have an undersize tolerance of +0/−0.0002 in (0.00508 mm), while reamer blanks have an oversize tolerance of −0/+00.0002 in (0.00508 mm).

Some mills also sell square stock that is held to the same tolerances under the name "drill rod".[3]

Commonly available material grades in the U.S. are A2, D2, M2, M42, O1, S7, W1, and high speed steel (including M2/M7).[4]

Ground flat stock[edit]

Ground flat stock is annealed steel that has been ground to close tolerances (compare to drill rod). There are four types of materials available: O-1 tool steel, A-2 tool steel, A-6 tool steel, and 1018 steel (low-carbon or low-carb steel). Lengths are either 18 or 36 in (457 or 914 mm) long, various widths up to 16 in (406 mm) are available, and thicknesses range from 1⁄64 to 2.875 in (0.40 to 73.03 mm).[5][6][7]

Some geometrical sizes are known as gauge plate.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^Brafield, Evans (February 2009), What's Billet?, archived from the original on March 6, 2010, retrieved March 5, 2010.
  2. ^Altan, Taylan; Ngaile, Gracious; Shen, Gangshu, Cold and Hot forging: Fundamentals and Applications 1 (1 ed.), ASM International
  3. ^ abBrady, George S.; Clauser, Henry R.; Vaccari, John A. (2002). Materials Handbook (15th ed.). McGraw-Hill. p. 322. ISBN .
  4. ^McMaster-Carr catalog (115th ed.), McMaster-Carr, pp. 3641–3653, retrieved 2010-12-19.
  5. ^Burroughs, John (March 1968), "What You Should Know About Ground Flat Stock", Popular Mechanics, 129 (3): 182–185, ISSN 0032-4558
  6. ^Starrett catalog 32(PDF), p. 624, archived from the original(PDF) on 2010-12-22, retrieved 2010-12-22.
  7. ^Starrett catalog 32(PDF), p. 634, archived from the original(PDF) on 2010-12-22, retrieved 2010-12-22.
  8. ^Nesbitt, Brian (2007). Handbook of Valves and Actuators. Butterworth-Heinemann. p. 17. ISBN .
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bar_stock
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  1. 02-07-2008, 10:30 AM#1
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    Unhappy looking for hex tubing in aluminum can't find any

    I have been trying to find some aluminum or stainless tubing in a hex shape, I would like it to be 3/8" with about a .062 wall or thicker, I looked at some circuit board standoffs, but I would still need to drill them out, but I am not against that if I can not find any stock in lengths.

  2. 02-07-2008, 03:07 PM#2
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    Good luck.
    I have sure never seen it.
    Aluminum, you could get extruded, assuming you needed enough- probably a ton or two would do it.
    I know there is a 2" aluminum hexagon they use for headache racks on fancy pickups, but its not easy to find either.
    Stainless, I kinda doubt exists.
    Have you ever seen this on another product, or are you just wishing?

    These guys have it in brass-
    http://www.lewisbrass.com/newCatalog/NewCat.pdf
    3/8" with an 040 wall.
    My guess is that in less than truckload quantities, this is gonna be your closest match.

  3. 02-07-2008, 03:34 PM#3
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    Small parts, Inc. has aluminum hex solids. http://www.smallparts.com/products/d...ions/zha%2Ecfm
    They do have brass hex in telescoping sizes. scott

  4. 02-07-2008, 05:07 PM#4
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    How much of this do you need?

    If you need under 100 feet of it, perhaps you could tinker around with draw-forming round tube stock through a steel die. You won't need to harden the die for low quantities.

    To make the die, first, use a drill slightly larger than the tube and lightly counter-sink the "input" side of the die. Mill a hex all the way through the die. With a file, sharpen the corners of the hex, and blend the round "input" into the hex "output".

    Mash down one end of the tube, poke it through the die, and put a clamp on it to pull with. Use a chain fall to pull the tube through the die. Keep the tube lubed -- with lubricant, not cutting fluid. Clearly, you need to have some solid mounting for both the die and the chain fall.

    I've never done this, but it was outlined in one of the Tim Remus books "Advanced Sheet Metal Fabrication" and "Ultimate Sheet Metal Fabrication".

  5. 02-07-2008, 06:58 PM#5
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    I saw a place in Germany I think that had hollow hex's. Kant say fer sure on the material? It was steel of some flavor.

    I kant even think of how I came acrost it? ...some job I was quoting at the time had some certain spec and this outfit did it - that's all I know. Now if I just knew what quote I could prolly find the outfit.

    Search hollow hexes I guess?

    Not sure if they went that small tho?

    -----

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

  6. 02-07-2008, 10:53 PM#6
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    Quote Originally Posted by snocat_trfView Post
    I have been trying to find some aluminum or stainless tubing in a hex shape, I would like it to be 3/8" with about a .062 wall or thicker, I looked at some circuit board standoffs, but I would still need to drill them out, but I am not against that if I can not find any stock in lengths.
    Turn a set(s) of dies and roll it.

  7. 02-08-2008, 10:48 PM#7
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    I found it. (Out of pure chance)

    http://http://www.vanleeuwen-precisie.nl/index.asp

    I kant find any shaped OD's listed, but the part that I was lookin' to quote was an octagon OD. I thought that I found shaped OD's on this site, but kant say fer sure anymore.

    Good luck.

    ------------

    H Ross in '08!
    Now more than ever!

  8. 02-09-2008, 03:40 AM#8
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  9. 09-30-2009, 04:22 AM#9
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    I know this is an old post to bring up but Google found it when i was searching for "aluminum hax tubing"
    The only place i've found it is left hander chasis. They make race car parts like myself.
    I used to buy soild hex bar and machine it on my Flathers and Sons lathe then i set up my Wade 94 turret. Now i just buy the "Tap tube"
    page 26 of the catalog lower right corner. They have all sizes in stock to.

    It's cheaper then solid stock!
    http://www.lefthanderchassis.com/26.html

    44Dwarf

  10. 09-30-2009, 07:09 AM#10
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    "As stock depletes, all HEX will be 8-sided!"

    LOL.

    New definition of hexagon.

    Jim

  11. 09-30-2009, 08:17 AM#11
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    A place that lists both 6-sided and 8-sided hex tube in their catalog does make you wonder about their credibility. It calls into question all of their merchandise descriptions. I notice they describe all their threaded products on that page by thread size, but never mention the pitch or even a UNC or UNF designation. And O. D. (outer diameter) is not a conventional way of describing the A. F. (across flats) size of a hex, whether it has 6 or 8 sides.

    Larry

  12. 10-02-2009, 07:08 AM#12
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    Remember they deal with Race car parts there are only a few thread sizes used...
    The hex stock is across the flats. They have stock and i've never seen hex or octagon tubing listed anywhere else. I've spent days looking in the past if somone knows a place that stocks it let us all know.

  13. 12-10-2012, 12:32 PM#13
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    Default Material and Parts Source

    Quote Originally Posted by snocat_trfView Post
    I have been trying to find some aluminum or stainless tubing in a hex shape, I would like it to be 3/8" with about a .062 wall or thicker, I looked at some circuit board standoffs, but I would still need to drill them out, but I am not against that if I can not find any stock in lengths.
    This in reply to a really old post, but for future reference, this stock car parts company has a lot of useful parts and materials, including AL hex tubing.
    www.lefthanderchassis.com

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Stock hex tube

A Note on DFARS:

DFAR and Domestic material available on request. While we choose the best mills on the market regardless of region, we prefer to choose material that is American made. We do stock NonDFAR in some sizes and grades with lower costs. If you are interested in purchasing DFAR or Domestic material, remind your sales rep to ensure that you receive DFAR or Domestic certified material. *Not All metal used in government or defense contracts requires DFARS’ standards.

DFARS QUALIFYING COUNTRIES
Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Israel, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. (Per DFARS 225.872-1): Qualifying Countries. Metals Requiring Compliance. Not All metal used in government or defense contracts requires DFARS’ standards. DFARS “Specialty Metals” requiring compliance (Per DFARS 252.225-7008): DFARS

ROHS is to restrict certain dangerous substances commonly used in electronic and electronic equipment. Any time you see Rohs it is being checked for the presence of Lead (Pb), Cadmium (Cd), Mercury (Hg), Hexavalent chromium (Hex-Cr), Polybrominated biphenyls (PBB), and Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE). For Cadmium and Hexavalent Chromium, there must be less than 0.01% of the substance by weight at raw homogeneous materials level. For Lead, PBB, and PBDE, there must be no more than 0.1% of the material, when calculated by weight at homogeneous raw materials. Any RoHS compliant component must have 100 ppm, or less of mercury and the mercury must not have been intentionally added to the component. In the EU, some military and medical equipment are exempt from RoHS compliance. (According to rohscompliantdefinition.com,2014)

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