Hotchkis challenger

Hotchkis challenger DEFAULT

MARC URBANO

INGO BARENSCHEE

When Dodge finally got around to answering the Mustang and Camaro in 1970, designer Carl Cameron’s coupe went wide and mouthy with the sheetmetal and put the occupants in a sort of speed bunker behind a big engine. Of course, the Challenger was a child of its era, dependent on a loud throttle and not much else for its performance. Places like Dead Man’s Curve thus exacted their butcher’s bills.

Nowadays, the trend in vintage muscle machinery is to modernize beneath the skin while leaving largely intact the enduring works of Cameron and his contemporaries. That means suspension and brake work, for starters, and the Hotchkis E-Max Challenger is a showboat for one company’s relatively affordable bolt-on handling kits.

Hotchkis Sport Suspension, in the Los Angeles suburb of  Santa Fe Springs, built up the roughly $70,000 E-Max from an eBay find. The black-and-yellow war paint, the 18-inch Forgeline ZX3 wheels ($3900), the Sparco Milano front buckets ($800), and the custom fiberglass air-scooping hood notwithstanding, the E-Max isn’t a fully reengineered Pro Touring overhaul on par with the six-figure ’69 “Red Devil” Camaro we profiled in August 2011.

MARC URBANO

This E-body Challenger (hence the name, which basically means “E to the max”) retains more of its vintage shaky vibe, with its original six-pack-carb setup atop a cammed-up 340 Mopar small-block V-8, bored 0.030 over and rattling the chassis’ loose rafters through Flowmasters and thundering side exhaust outlets. When it’s cold, you can hear each cylinder firing like individual sticks of dynamite, a raunchy piper’s tune that draws out the neighborhood’s 14-to-18-year-old male population in herds. A five-speed Tremec transmission adds a welcome overdrive and digs the 3524-pound hunk of teen fantasy out of a hole briskly.

The 60-mph mark passed in 5.3 seconds, but the first couple of upshifts proved balky, as though the transmission were tired, and pushed the quarter-mile to 14 seconds flat.

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Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/a15121435/hotchkis-e-max-dodge-challenger-feature/

1970-1974 Dodge Challenger Hotchkis TVS (Total Vehicle Suspension System).

Applications: Leaf springs pictured do not represent actual springs.

1970-1974 Dodge Challenger Hotchkis TVS (Total Vehicle Suspension System). The new Hotchkis TVS for 70-74 Dodge Challengers is the easiest and most effective way to give your Mopar incredible sports car handling. Engineered as a tuned performance system the TVS kit will reduce body roll dramatically improve handling and create incredible driver control for a more enjoyable driving experience. Balanced handling is achieved using geometry corrected upper control arms adjustable strut rods adjustable steering rods front and rear sport sway bars geometry corrected rear leaf springs and sub frame connectors. The Hotchkis TVS works with your stock K-member preserving the soul of your Mopar. While infusing it with incredible heart-pounding Viper handling. Benefits: Provides modern sports car handling for classic Mopar muscle cars. Dramatically improves steering and chassis response. Increases stability improves traction reduces body roll by increasing front/rear roll stiffness. Easy installation with minor welding involved. Features: Tuned balanced system for optimum handling. Contains:# 1110 Geometry Corrected Tubular Control Arms #14366 Adjustable Strut Rods #16366 Adjustable Steering Rods #2254 Lightweight Durable 1-1/4 in. Tubular Front Bar Adjustable 13/16 in. Tubular Rear Bar #243667 Geometry Corrected Leaf Springs #4011L Sub Frame Connectors Note: Leaf springs pictured do not represent actual springs. Hotchkis final design incorporates 3 leafs for a lighter design. Want to learn more? Check out our FAQ at www.hotchkis.net

Sale PriceSale Runs 11/27/19 - 12/02/19

FREE GROUND SHIPPING on orders over $1,000 Details

Description

Applications: Leaf springs pictured do not represent actual springs.

1970-1974 Dodge Challenger Hotchkis TVS (Total Vehicle Suspension System). The new Hotchkis TVS for 70-74 Dodge Challengers is the easiest and most effective way to give your Mopar incredible sports car handling. Engineered as a tuned performance system the TVS kit will reduce body roll dramatically improve handling and create incredible driver control for a more enjoyable driving experience. Balanced handling is achieved using geometry corrected upper control arms adjustable strut rods adjustable steering rods front and rear sport sway bars geometry corrected rear leaf springs and sub frame connectors. The Hotchkis TVS works with your stock K-member preserving the soul of your Mopar. While infusing it with incredible heart-pounding Viper handling. Benefits: Provides modern sports car handling for classic Mopar muscle cars. Dramatically improves steering and chassis response. Increases stability improves traction reduces body roll by increasing front/rear roll stiffness. Easy installation with minor welding involved. Features: Tuned balanced system for optimum handling. Contains:# 1110 Geometry Corrected Tubular Control Arms #14366 Adjustable Strut Rods #16366 Adjustable Steering Rods #2254 Lightweight Durable 1-1/4 in. Tubular Front Bar Adjustable 13/16 in. Tubular Rear Bar #243667 Geometry Corrected Leaf Springs #4011L Sub Frame Connectors Note: Leaf springs pictured do not represent actual springs. Hotchkis final design incorporates 3 leafs for a lighter design. Want to learn more? Check out our FAQ at www.hotchkis.net

Features and Benefits:

  • Engineered To Work Together As Suspension Package
  • Dramatically improves steering and chassis response
  • Increases stability, improves traction, reduces body roll
  • Easy installation with minor welding involved
  • Lightweight, Durable 1-1/4 in. Tubular Front Bar
  • Adjustable 13/16 in. Tubular Rear Bar
  • Geometry Corrected Tubular Control Arms and Leaf Springs
  • Adjustable Strut Rods and Steering Rods

Product Attributes

Includes Tie Rod EndsYes
Includes Tie Rod End SleevesYes
Includes End Link BushingsYes
Bushing ColorBlack
Includes Mounting HardwareYes
Sours: https://www.hotchkis.net/product/1970-1974-dodge-challenger-hotchkis-tvs-total-vehicle-suspension-system/
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2013+ Dodge Challenger Stage 1 Total Vehicle System by Hotchkis Sport Suspension

Applications: 2013+ Dodge Challenger. Note: Some models come equipped with self leveling shock absorbers. Models with self leveling shock will need to upgrade rear shocks in order to lower vehicle.

Hotchkis Sport Suspension 80121-1 Stage 1 TVS Kit for 2013+ Dodge Challenger. High performance springs 2 1/8 in. front drop and 1.8 in. rear drop on RT and 13/16 in. (21 mm) front drop 1-1/4 in. (32mm) rear drop on SRT models. Lightweight Tubular 1.5 in. front sway bar and 3/4 in. tubular rear sway bar in a durable gloss black powder coat finish. Includes greasable polyurethane bushings and mounts for rear give you everything you need for direct bolt-on installation with no vehicle modifications. The Hotchkis Sport Suspension Stage 1 TVS system for the 2013+ Dodge Challenger RT & SRT offers a sleek lowered stance dramatically improved handling and superior driver control by reducing body roll improving steering response while giving you a sleek lowered stance with sporty yet comfortable ride. Allows suspension tuning for optimum track or street performance. Our engineers poured over track testing data to develop a balanced handling system comfortable enough for the street but well balanced for the occasional track day or your favorite twisty road. The system is comprised of lowered higher rate sport coil springs paired with front and rear lightweight sway bars. All components are manufactured in the USA come with complete hardware greasable bushings and are finished off in a durable powder coated finish. This bolt on upgrade can transform your Challenger into a canyon carver in minutes. Some 2013+ Dodge Challenger RT's are equipped with self leveling shocks. If your model has self leveling rear suspension the rear shocks will need to be changed in order to lower the vehicle. Hotchkis offers a kit which includes the rear shocks.

Sale PriceSale Runs 11/27/19 - 12/02/19

FREE GROUND SHIPPING on orders over $1,000 Details

Description

Applications: 2013+ Dodge Challenger. Note: Some models come equipped with self leveling shock absorbers. Models with self leveling shock will need to upgrade rear shocks in order to lower vehicle.

Hotchkis Sport Suspension 80121-1 Stage 1 TVS Kit for 2013+ Dodge Challenger. High performance springs 2 1/8 in. front drop and 1.8 in. rear drop on RT and 13/16 in. (21 mm) front drop 1-1/4 in. (32mm) rear drop on SRT models. Lightweight Tubular 1.5 in. front sway bar and 3/4 in. tubular rear sway bar in a durable gloss black powder coat finish. Includes greasable polyurethane bushings and mounts for rear give you everything you need for direct bolt-on installation with no vehicle modifications. The Hotchkis Sport Suspension Stage 1 TVS system for the 2013+ Dodge Challenger RT & SRT offers a sleek lowered stance dramatically improved handling and superior driver control by reducing body roll improving steering response while giving you a sleek lowered stance with sporty yet comfortable ride. Allows suspension tuning for optimum track or street performance. Our engineers poured over track testing data to develop a balanced handling system comfortable enough for the street but well balanced for the occasional track day or your favorite twisty road. The system is comprised of lowered higher rate sport coil springs paired with front and rear lightweight sway bars. All components are manufactured in the USA come with complete hardware greasable bushings and are finished off in a durable powder coated finish. This bolt on upgrade can transform your Challenger into a canyon carver in minutes. Some 2013+ Dodge Challenger RT's are equipped with self leveling shocks. If your model has self leveling rear suspension the rear shocks will need to be changed in order to lower the vehicle. Hotchkis offers a kit which includes the rear shocks.

Features and Benefits:

  • Engineered To Work Together As Suspension Package
  • Includes Sport Coils and Lightweight Tubular Sway Bars
  • Dramatically Improves Handling And Stability
  • Improves Vehicle Looks
  • Precision wound in the USA
  • Highest quality high tensile steel
  • Durable powder coat finish
Sours: https://www.hotchkis.net/product/2013-dodge-challenger-stage-1-total-vehicle-system-by-hotchkis-sport-suspension/
Hotchkis E Max Dodge Challenger (1080q)

09 Challenger FAQ

09+ Challenger Technical Page

Which spring is right for my Challenger?

Hotchkis Sport Suspension has spent numerous hours developing a system for the 09 Challenger that has the perfect blend of High Performance, and a comfortable ride. Based on consumer demand we have developed spring options for the Challenger owner in regards to the desired amount of drop.

SRT owners can enjoy a comfortable ride, and a moderately lowered stance by using our spring kit #19107. This kit lowers the SRT 5/8″ Front and 1″ Rear for a subtle drop. The Challenger SRT below is equipped with a Hotchkis TVS consisting of 19107 Sport Coil Springs, and 22107 Sway Bars.

RT owners have a choice of drops and can enjoy a comfortable ride, and a moderately lowered stance by using our spring kit #19108. This kit lowers the RT 1 7/16″ Front and 11/16″ Rear for a subtle drop. The Challenger RT below is equipped with a Hotchkis TVS consisting of 19108 Sport Coil Springs, and 22107 Sway Bars.

For those RT owners looking for a more aggressive drop, the 19107 springs from the SRT can be used for a 2″ drop all the way around. The Challenger RT below is equipped with the 19107 Sport Coil Springs and 22107 Sway Bars.

NIVOMAT Equipped Cars

Owners with cars that are equipped with the NIVOMAT self leveling shock absorbers are not able to lower the vehicle without a shock change. We have successfully installed the Bilstein shocks on these cars with great results.
More information on Nivomat courtesy of Edmunds Inside Line

Alignment

Many new Challenger owners have asked questions regarding alignment after lowering their vehicles as many alignment shops tell them the vehicle is “out of spec.” Obviously vehicles that have been lowered will have alignments that vary from the original settings, but what is acceptable?

From our experience tuning suspension systems, vehicles will benefit by running negative camber in the front which allows more tire contact patch during cornering. Owners are sometimes concerned about tire wear when running negative camber. The truth to the matter is, camber (unless excessive -2.5″ or greater) plays less a role in tire wear than does toe. Often the cause of uneven tire wear is blamed on camber when the true problem is toe. By properly aligning the vehicle after lowering and setting the toe settings to 1/16 front and 3/16″ rear total toe in, tire wear can be minimized.

After installing our 19108 Sport Coils Springs (Front: 1-7/16″ Rear: 11/16″ Drop) on a 09 RT we were able to achieve the following alignment specs without the use of any aftermarket alignment products.
Front Camber -0.8°
Rear Camber -1°

These camber settings are perfectly acceptable for daily driving and will not adversely affect tire wear. Toe was set to front 1/16” total toe in and the rear 3/16” total toe in. These are the settings you should be using for Toe.

The SRT8 models experience slightly different alignment specs as well as RT models using the 19107 springs. We have seen -1.3° in front and -1.8° at these lower heights. While the front is still within acceptable range, the rear could benefit from some form of aftermarket alignment kits. Optimum rear camber settings would be -1 to -1.5°

The key to properly aligning these vehicles is:
1. Make sure the rear sub frame is aligned and installed correctly after changing the rear springs, a mis-aligned sub frame will create alignment issues.
2. Use an experienced alignment shop. Just because someone does alignments, doesn’t necessarily mean they know what they are doing. Performance cars with aftermarket parts require special needs, and experience.

Bump Steer

Bump steer was a topic of conversation we found in many internet threads, so we measured a 09 R/T to determine the amount of Bump Steer, or toe change the vehicle experiences. These are the numbers we recorded for front bump steer:

The toe change during bump travel is very minimal, showing only a 1/16” of total toe change within 3 inches of bump travel. 1/16” of a inch is so minimal the driver wouldn’t even be able to feel it. Compare that to a stock 70′ Challenger with over 3/8” of an inch of change. From these numbers, it is not necessary to purchase or install any aftermarket bump steer kits on the 09 Challenger at these lowered heights.

cWant to learn more about Bump Steer? The video below explains how we measure bump steer.

What will upgrading my sway bars do?

Sway bars are the most significant upgrade many Challenger owners will make in regards to improving the vehicles handling. Upgraded sway bars reduce body roll, and improve cornering and handling performance without adversly affecting ride quality. Hotchkis Sport Suspension develops sway bars through vehicle testing. While many companies produce sway bars that are merely larger than stock using engineering formulas, we take the vehicle to the track and use 600 FT Slalom data to help us determine the best handling balance for the particular vehicle. This testing allows us to design the best sway bars on the market and ensure our customers the ultimate performance possible.

I have a SRT, how can your sway bars be any better?

There is always room for improvement. From the factory vehicles are tuned to offer a level of performance that sells cars to the masses. Aftermarket products exist for those consumers that want to take their production vehicle to the next level of performance.

Below is a chart of factory sway bar sizes and equivilent Hotchkis upgrades.

ModelStock FrontStock RearHotchkis FrontHotchkis RearHotchkis % Change
Magnum30MM Solid15MM Solid35MM Tubular19MM Tubular+30% F, +150% R
300C/SRT827MM Solid15MM Solid35MM Tubular1MM Tubular+100%F,+150%R
Charger27MM Solid15MM Solid35MM Solid19MM Tubular+100%F,+150%R
Charger SRT27MM Solid15MM Solid35MM Solid19MM Tubular+100%F,+150%R
Challenger30MM Solid15MM Solid38MM Solid19MM Tubular+100%F,+150%R
Challenger SRT30MM Solid15MM Solid38MM Solid19MM Tubular+100%F,+150%R

 

OTHER FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Q: Does lowering the suspension on my Challenger put extra stress or strain on my suspension parts? I have heard I should buy a bump steer kit to aleviate stress.

Answer: At the lowered ride heights, the vehicles static ride has been changed from factory, but the arc of travel the suspension follows remains the same, therefore the steering components and ball joints will see the same range of motion as designed from the factory. The aftermarket bump-steer kits can allow the owner to change the relative location of the steering arm, in relation to the spindle, but the arc of travel the suspension follows will always remain constant. The rod ends that are typically used in steering upgrades offer a superior level of steering feel over factory tie rods, and may offer better articulation and adjustment, but there can be a downside to that as well. Rod ends typically have a lower service life than factory tie rods, and often become noisy over time. We use rod end steering components on other platforms, so we are not here to say they do not have their place in performance applications. Drivers just need to be aware that when used on daily driven vehicles, additional noise may be present.

Sours: https://www.hotchkis.net/09-challenger-faq/

Challenger hotchkis

Hotchkis TVS equipped 1970 Challenger wins vendor class in the autocross and finishes 4th out of 70 cars on the road course at Michigan’s Gingerman Raceway

Photos by Hotchkis staff and Steve Chryssos 

On June 18th we unloaded our 1970 “E-Max” Challenger in Michigan for the Motor State Challenge, a three day event that included a car cruise, autocross and road course competition. Many of the fastest, most expensive and sophisticated pro-touring muscle cars completed in a battle for bragging rights and g-machine supremacy. Despite being outgunned by extremely high-dollar cars with nearly double the horsepower, we decided to represent the undersubscribed Mopar community and bring E-Max to the competition. When the smoke (and Midwestern rain) cleared, E-Max was the fastest car in the autocross vendor challenge and the fourth quickest on the 1.88 mile Gingerman Raceway road course – out of 70 cars! 

The event was sponsored by Motor State Distributing, Lane Automotive and Allstar Performance Products and was held in a variety of locations near scenic Lake Michigan. A Friday afternoon car cruise through the back roads of Harbor County and along the Lake Michigan shore, culminated with a delicious barbecue at Warren Dunes State Park. No sooner had the group settled down to plates of steaming hot BBQ Ribs, Chicken and Pulled Pork a Michigan park ranger drove by warning about a severe storm brewing. The locals quickly jumped into their freshly detailed muscle cars and hit the road. The rest of us, especially the Californians, waited to see the action which soon turned into an incredibly fierce storm (complete with black skies, lightning bolts and sideways rain) that can only be found in the Midwest in June. 

On Saturday the skies were clear and we were treated to perfect weather for road racing at Gingerman Raceway in South Haven, Michigan. Talk about an excited and passionate group! We were thrilled to speak with the owners of some 70 truly incredible pro-touring machines. The quality of cars at this event was incredible, many of which were packing in excess of 500 horsepower with sophisticated, intricate suspension systems and seriously pumped up engines. Our factory test driver, Mark Hotchkis, drove E-Max hard on the course, and in the end the moderately modified Mopar finished 4th out of 70 with a 1:38.32 lap time. Considering the fact that E-Max has a relatively stock 340 with a Six Pack and weighs nearly 3,600 pounds, it is a true testament to both the Hotchkis bolt-on Total Vehicle Suspension system and the driver that we bested some truly incredible machines, including a variety of LS7 and LS9 powered four-link equipped Camaros. 

1.88 Mile Roadcourse Qualifying lap times for Motor State Challenge Quick 16 
1. Mark Stielow LS9 powered 69 Camaro 1:36.1 
2. Jeff Schwartz 1994 LS1 Ultima GT 1:36:4 
3. Brian Finch 600 HP 71 Camaro 1:37:1 
4. Mark Hotchkis 70 Challenger 1:38:32 
5. Kyle Tucker ‘70 DSE Camaro 1:38:37 
6. Phil Gerber Roadster Shop LS powered 70 Chevelle 1:38:37 
7. Charley Lillard LS powered 69 Camaro 1:39:0 

On Sunday, we wrapped up the event with an extended autocross that was laid out at Lake Michigan College and managed by the local SCCA chapter. This is the event where E-Max truly excelled, fresh off its overall Vendor class win at the GoodGuys Orange County Nationals. The car’s geometry corrected leaf springs and a-arms truly shone in this event, as the car stuck like glue and Mark managed to eek out a 1:34.37 lap time, besting Phil Gerber in the Roadster Shop 1970 Chevelle (1:34.38) and Kyle Tucker in the DSE Camaro (1:34.39). 

Autocross Challenge-Vendor Challenge 
1. Mark Hotchkis 70 Challenger 1.34.37 
2. Phil Gerber Roadster Shop 70 Chevelle 1.34.38 
3. Kyle Tucker 71 Camaro 1.34.39 

“What a terrific muscle car event!”, exclaimed John Hotchkis just after the awards ceremony. “We want to thank our friends at Motor State Distributing for hosting such a fantastic weekend.” said Hotchkis. After a long haul to Michigan we were ecstatic that our heavy Mopar with bolt-on suspension parts including performance leaf springs, torsion bars and a mild 340 small block not only held its own but actually dominated, besting most of the 600+ horsepower highly modified muscle cars. As we continue to refine E-Max through competitions like the Motor State Challenge, we apply what we learn to every Hotchkis Sport Suspension component. We can’t wait for next year’s Challenge!

 

Sours: https://www.hotchkis.net/hotchkis-e-max-challenger-shines-motor-state-challenge/
Hotchkis 70 Challenger Cornering \u0026 Donuts

Driven: The Hotchkis E-Max Challenger

Words & Photography: Luke Ray.

Emails, emails, emails. There was a point in time, I seem to remember, when receiving an email was a pretty special thing. It was all so new and fresh. There was something cool about that notification that someone had sent you a message through this bizarre new form of contact. Safe to say that now that same notion has been somewhat turned on it’s head, and of the barrage of data that lands in my inbox on a daily basis, only a small fraction of it is what I would call stimulating reading. That ‘special feeling’ has now transitioned to those special emails that stand head and shoulders above the rest.

5th October, 2010. “Hey, I work with a media agency here in Los Angeles. I just stumbled across Fuel Magazine online and I would love to work with you if you are ever out this way.” It was Elana. Elana works for a PR agency in LA, with some pretty cool automotive clientele on the books. This really made me pay attention. I had been procrastinating for a while about making the first FM trip out to the States to have a look around and spread the word about the magazine. I hadn’t really considered the possibility of being hooked up with some heavy American iron whilst on such a trip, but as it panned out, this is exactly what was going to happen. Forward a few months, and after some more research about a good time to visit the US, a trip was finally locked in to hit Viva Las Vegas in April. That and some extended plans in the L.A. area combined to form the basis of a crazy, fun, amazing two weeks.

Looking back on my email conversation with Elana, we threw around many ideas over nearly 40 emails to and fro. Company visits and events were coming at me thick and fast, but there was one comment the stuck out above the rest; “We could hook you up with a car for a few hours. What sort of thing are you interested in?”

What do you say to that? I’d spent the previous 34 years admiring and lusting after vehicles from all corners of every genre, and now I get a question like that? Given where I was heading for this trip, and the cars that I had started to surround myself with more over the Fuel Magazine years, my answer went back confidently; “Muscle or Mopar. Late ‘60s/early ‘70s. It’s gotta be tough, loud, and if at all possible, in a lairy paint colour with some period graphics.”

Talk about delivering. “We’ll get you in the Hotchkis E-Max Challenger” was the response. A quick Internet look up, and it was soon apparent that I would be getting everything that I had asked for.. and more. The first search result; Jay Leno doing a burnout in the E-Max. The second; A video of a guy from Hotchkis doing circle work with the car in a parking lot. On top of that, the ‘few hours’ had grown considerably to ‘24 hours’. I had a feeling I was going to enjoy this.

14th April, 2011. I pull up at Hotchkis H.Q. in Santa Fe Springs, California. Henry Hancock welcomed me and gave me a full tour of the facility, showing me the precision and skill that goes into both the Hotchkis products themselves, and the projects that they take on for customers wanting a full ride and handling transformation. It was fascinating, as it usually is, to see the behind the scenes goings on. However, my time with the E-Max was now down to 23 hours and 20 minutes, and I was dying to get in the hot seat. Finally, at the end of the tour, Henry casually mentioned “I’ll go get the car, see you in the parking lot”.

There she was. All 395 bhp of her, standing there with a killer stance and a paint job that was testing with full force my new pair of Oakley Jurys that I had bought on Hollywood Blvd the day before. If my Honda rental car looked boring before, it looked downright embarrassing now that the E-Max had pulled up along side. More than a little intimidated at first, I waited for Henry to give me the full tour of the car. It didn’t really happen. “Put your bag in the passenger foot well, there’s not a whole lot of space back there” he said, gesturing at the back end of the car. “Oh, and let me show you the fuel filler lock.. it can be a little tricky”. After he showed me the technique to stop complete embarrassment at the filler pumps (of which I saw many), the only other information that I got was that the engine was a nearly new unit. “Since we changed it, we’ve only taken the car out on an autocross event, it hasn’t been tested on the road yet”. The intimidation level just went up a notch. So, I was to be the first to give this new engine a good workout on California roads. Pretty cool, but somewhat daunting at the same time. Then, Henry’s parting words were “Ok, so you’re all set to go. Have fun.”

What? I thought.. No “Careful with the gears, it can be tricky in 3rd” or “Only go up to 2000 rpm until hot”. I was at expecting a list of special instructions to keep this finely tuned beast on the straight and narrow.. but nothing. As Henry was about to walk off, I gingerly asked; “Anything else I need to know”, with a simple, “No that’s it” in response. As I started to climb into the E-Max, Henry paused. “Oh, there is just one more thing..” “Great, what’s that?” I said. “There’s a T-shirt for you in the trunk!”

The E-Max is a 1970 Dodge Challenger T/A with a 340 Six Pack that was built by Hotchkis to take auto crossing. It wasn’t designed to extensively cruise the Southern Californian highways and mountain roads, but that’s exactly where I took it, and it more than stood up to the challenges, including crawling through heavy LA traffic a couple of times. Of course, there was no air conditioning to help me out but somehow I didn’t notice how hot and muggy it was. It’s amazing how excitement and awe can block out things like that.

I was out of the LA area as soon as possible, and I was headed south. I wanted to experience this car on different roads. Not just to see how the E-Max itself feels in different situations, but to also give me a glimpse of the different sights and sounds of a new and far away land. I had a rough plan; head down to Costa Mesa for a bite to eat, then branch off inland and head for the hills. Which hills in particular I had no idea, but if this baby was built for autocross work, I was going to try and get as much fun out of it as possible.

If you’re American and reading this, you’re going to glaze over when I talk about the satisfaction of cruising down a Southern Californian freeway. But this was special. A little boy from England that once dreamt of cars such as this at boarding school was now all grown up and behind the wheel of a piece of iconic American automotive history and rumbling along without a care in the world. At this point, I didn’t care about going fast, or blasting through the gears, it was all about taking in the moment and hoping the next 22 hours would be long ones!

A quick bite in Costa Mesa, and I pushed on further south. I had chosen a point on the map and I was going to stick to it. That point was Palomar Mountain Observatory in the Palomar Mountain State Park, north east of Escondido. I had no idea how long it would take, or what the route was like, but the little yellow line on the map was very wiggly so my mind was made up.

A left turn at Oceanside and I was headed inland, where the roads started to get a whole lot more interesting. It wasn’t long before I was suddenly surrounded by orange groves as far as the eye could see. An impromptu photo stop was essential. The green leaves and the fresh, bright orange of the fruit was a perfect back drop on a warm, sunny California afternoon. But that sun was not going to hang around too long, and after a quick chat with a very nice Police patrol who wondered what the heck was going on as I was crouching amongst the oranges for that money shot, I was off again.

The scenery was changing, and the experience with the E-Max was changing with it. Gone was the long, loud highway cruising. Now I was in gear-changing territory, and it was fun. It wasn’t long before the road got narrower, steeper, and a whole lot more twisty. This is where the E-Max came into it’s element. The Psychology of it was bizarre. I was in a heavy, 1970 Dodge Challenger, and yet it was going up the side of a mountain like it had a big tab hanging out underneath, there was a slot in the road, and somewhere there was a big kid with a hand controller squeezed on to full. It was mind bending. This was easily on par with throwing an old mid-engined Porsche around European country roads at full chat, and I’ve done that. A lot. The E-Max was begging for more on every corner as I pounded it up that hill, asking me to brake that little bit later, to let the revs go that little bit higher in each gear, to trust the tyres that little bit more. If any car was to bring the Steve McQueen out of you.. this is it.

And yet, the E-Max didn’t complain once. Nothing went wrong, nothing got too hot, nothing slipped a little too much around that hairpin. I am not, by any stretch of the imagination, a great driver. But I’m not a bad one either, and that was the beauty of the E-Max Challenger. It didn’t command a high level of track competency, nor did it ask that you treat it with kid gloves from the turn-key moment. This car scoops you up and nurtures what skill you do have, and encourages you to learn that little bit more about the potential of a car like this. Right there, mid corner, as you are pushing up the side of a mountain, it mutters in your ear “You can do this.”

I have no idea how long it took to get up to the top of Palomar Mountain. Sitting here recalling that day, it really doesn’t matter. I just remember that the light was fading, which spurred me on even more in a gotta make it before sunset kind of way. And make it before sunset I did. Just. The observatory was closed, and I was faced with a big yellow gate with the word END signposted on it. Quite apt really, after the journey I had just been through. As the light was fading, all I could do was sit in awe from the side of the road, staring at the E-Max, allowing my heart rate to relax and take in what had just happened. I had the utmost respect for this car whilst I was in the driver’s seat, and never for one moment did I doubt that the car would let me down.

The sun went firmly down over the Californian hills, I got back in the car, strapped myself back in to the Simpson harnesses, and put my new pair of Jurys to bed.

All I had to worry about now was finding the headlight switch and doing it all over again in the other direction.

Hotchkis E-Max Challenger

1970 Dodge Challenger R/T Clone

DriveTrain

340 6-pack Dodge small block

Custom Moroso oil pan

Be Cool Aluminum Radiator

Red Line Synthetic Oil

MSD ignition

Classic 5-Speed Tremec TKO

Exhaust

Flowmaster Exhaust

Brakes

Stoptech

Wheels

Forgeline Wheels and Nitto Tires

Interior

Sparco Milano 2 seats

Hurst Shifter

Redline Gauge Works Cluster

Grant Wheel

Suspension

Hotchkis E-Body TVS

100’ radius Skidpad: 0.92g

600’ Slalom: 66 mph

1/4 : 13.80 (on street tires)

HP: 395 hp

Torque: 378 ft.lbs.

This article first appeared in Fuel Magazine issue 08.

Luke RayUnited States, Dodge, Challenger, Muscle

Sours: http://fueltank.cc/blog/hotchkis-challenger

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2015+ Dodge Challenger Hellcat Sport Coil Springs from Hotchkis Sport Suspension

Applications: 2015+ Dodge Challenger Hellcat

Hotchkis Sport Suspension (19122) 2015+ Dodge Challenger Hellcat Coil Springs. The 2015+ Dodge Challenger Hellcat is an incredible car with notable handling capability. Installing our new sport coil springs offer a sleek lowered stance dramatically improved handling and superior driver control thanks to a lower center of gravity. Our engineers poured over computer modeling and track testing data to create the ultimate spring for Hellcat Challengers that improves handling while offering a sporty yet comfortable ride. Besides the very noticeable street driving improvement, they work extremely well in autocross, road course and open road-racing applications. These Hotchkis Performance Springs were developed as a complete front and rear balanced system giving the Hellcat Challenger an aggressive stance and balanced handling especially when combined with Hotchkis Sport Sway Bars (22121). Our front Sport Lowering Springs are rated at 280 lbs/in with a .750? or 19mm drop in the front and our rear Sport Lowering Springs are rated at 695 lbs/in with a 1? or 25.4mm drop in the rear. Precision wound in the USA from the highest quality high tensile steel they are finished in Hotchkis durable gloss powder coat.

Sale PriceSale Runs 11/27/19 - 12/02/19

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Description

Applications: 2015+ Dodge Challenger Hellcat

Hotchkis Sport Suspension (19122) 2015+ Dodge Challenger Hellcat Coil Springs. The 2015+ Dodge Challenger Hellcat is an incredible car with notable handling capability. Installing our new sport coil springs offer a sleek lowered stance dramatically improved handling and superior driver control thanks to a lower center of gravity. Our engineers poured over computer modeling and track testing data to create the ultimate spring for Hellcat Challengers that improves handling while offering a sporty yet comfortable ride. Besides the very noticeable street driving improvement, they work extremely well in autocross, road course and open road-racing applications. These Hotchkis Performance Springs were developed as a complete front and rear balanced system giving the Hellcat Challenger an aggressive stance and balanced handling especially when combined with Hotchkis Sport Sway Bars (22121). Our front Sport Lowering Springs are rated at 280 lbs/in with a .750? or 19mm drop in the front and our rear Sport Lowering Springs are rated at 695 lbs/in with a 1? or 25.4mm drop in the rear. Precision wound in the USA from the highest quality high tensile steel they are finished in Hotchkis durable gloss powder coat.

Features and Benefits:

Sours: https://www.hotchkis.net/product/2015-dodge-challenger-hellcat-sport-coil-springs-from-hotchkis-sport-suspension/


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